Updated Daily  5/27/2017 RochesterEnvironment.com

Our Environment is changing: Keep up with the Change. *Note: Henceforth 'environment' means "our life support system."


Rochester, NY was one of the hosts of the World Canal Conference on September 19, 2010.

If it deals with the environment, Rochester, New York, and the Internet, it's here.

Adapting to and mitigating Climate Change in a way that sustains all life while striving to do so equitably is the defining issue of our time.  How we comport ourselves during this historic trial by fire will reveal our true nature.

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Since 1998, RochesterEnvironment.com has been an ongoing experiment to completely inform one community [Rochester, NY] of all its environmental Newslinks, Events, Daily Updates, Resources, Environmental Education, regional Climate Change, and Environmental Issues. Green Apps, and more...    * Please read this carefully, it's not the usual Yada Yada

(Above scripts from Dynamic Drive)  [Website best viewed on your tablet device.]

RochesterEnvironment.com – This is site a free media resource to encourage public dialogue on local environmental issues, a local newspaper devoted to a single community’s environment, an archive of Environmental News to capture a proper sense of time in which environmental issues transpire, and an attempt to frame environmental issues free of corporate, governmental, and any ideology.  Sustainability, connecting the dots of our environmental information, rules.  Understanding that all of our local Environmental Issues now must be interpreted in the context of Climate Change, which will be continually moving the bar on the state of our environment, is critical for our survival.  We Don't Get It!

The great conundrum of our times is that in a time of rapidly occurring Climate Change and a rapid disintegration of the environment that we need to thrive and survive, mainstream media still marginalizes environmental concerns. [Check often for this continually updated list on the possible consequences of Climate Change in our region--supported by facts.] If there isn’t a quick and substantial change in how environmental concerns are reported, edited, and chosen in mainstream media, the public will continue to believe that environmental concerns are merely special interest matters, issues they can avoid if they choose.  How can we inform the public and monitor our environment without abridging our Freedoms--in enough time to save ourselves?   Bookmark This Site

This short video about addressing Climate Change from friend and dedicated advocate for strong action on Climate Change. Paul’s message, the importance of showing up and demonstrating that you care about our people and our planet, will get you moving. Imagine if we all felt and ACTED towards our life support system as Paul. RT. Please make Paul’s message go viral. #StandUpForScience  #climatechangeshealth  ClimateFacts #MarchForScience #ScienceMatters #ClimateChange

Likely Changes     Real Changes      Frank's Essays     Climate Studies

Anything else you're interested in is not going to happen if you can't breathe the air and drink the water. Don't sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet.-- Carl Sagan

 

Page Contents: Rochester-area NewsLinks | Daily Updates | Green Business | Top 10 things you can do for our environment | Green Events | Green Actions | This month's Winner of the Environmental Site Award

 

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Rochester area NewsLinks.

NewsLinks: Get the most important environmental news of the day and monitor your environment daily.  Also: Get Newslinks since 1998… Unlike other news, environmental news often takes time to reach our attention. Follow potential problems and catch them before they're catastrophes.

 

This week's RENewsletter has been published RENewsletter May 21, 2017 Each week get all the environmental news, events, actions and comment free.  Click Subscribe

 

Today's Rochester-Area Environmental News:

My hope is that you will read these stories and connect them to the world we now live in, one that is warming because of Climate Change.  Then pass these stories to those you are connected to and have them spread the word.  Mainstream media is either unwilling or incapable of reporting responsibly and adequately on a world that is warming, which is why many still don’t understand the vast changes we must make to adapt and mitigate Climate Change. 

Posted Today - Saturday, May 27, 2017

  • In Europe, World Leaders Try To Change Trump's Mind On Climate Change It was eight against one, according to German Chancellor Angela Merkel. On one side, leaders of Canada, Japan, France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, plus two EU representatives. On the other side, President Trump. And up for debate, the peril of climate change and the urgency of the U.S. commitment to the Paris accord to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Merkel said that everyone at the table at the G-7 summit in Taormina, Italy, was urging Trump to stick with the pact, according to Reuters. (May 26, 2017) WXXI News [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • How to improve the health of the ocean The ocean sustains humanity. Humanity treats it with contempt EARTH is poorly named. The ocean covers almost three-quarters of the planet. It is divided into five basins: the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian, the Arctic and the Southern oceans. Were all the planet’s water placed over the United States, it would form a column of liquid 132km tall. The ocean provides 3bn people with almost a fifth of their protein (making fish a bigger source of the stuff than beef). Fishing and aquaculture assure the livelihoods of one in ten of the world’s people. Climate and weather systems depend on the temperature patterns of the ocean and its interactions with the atmosphere. If anything ought to be too big to fail, it is the ocean. Humans have long assumed that the ocean’s size allowed them to put anything they wanted into it and to take anything they wanted out. Changing temperatures and chemistry, overfishing and pollution have stressed its ecosystems for decades. The ocean stores more than nine-tenths of the heat trapped on Earth by greenhouse-gas emissions. Coral reefs are suffering as a result; scientists expect almost all corals to be gone by 2050. (May 27, 2017) The Economist

  • DEC Advises Motorists to Be Alert for Turtles Crossing the Road New York Motorists Encouraged to Safely Move Turtles to Side of the Road The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today reminded the public that the state's native turtles are on the move in May and June seeking sandy areas or loose soil to lay their eggs. Drivers that see a turtle on the road should use caution and should not swerve suddenly or leave their lane of travel, but take care to avoid hitting turtles while driving. In New York, thousands of turtles are killed each year when they are struck by vehicles as the turtles migrate to their nesting areas. New York's 11 native species of land turtles are in decline, and turtles can take more than 10 years to reach breeding age. The reptiles lay just one small clutch of eggs each year, which means the loss of a breeding female can have a significant effect on the local turtle population. (May 26, 2017) NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (more on Wildlife in our area]

  • DEC Encourages New Yorkers to Learn about Harmful Algal Blooms as Warm Weather Starts DEC Releases New Brochure to Help Residents Detect, Avoid, and Report HABs The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today encouraged New Yorkers to learn about Harmful Algal Blooms, or "HABs," as DEC's 2017 HABs notification season starts on May 26, and the weather becomes warmer. To help educate the public about HABs, also known as blue green algae, DEC released a new brochure explaining how to detect, avoid and report HABs, as well as the health risks of HABs. "Harmful algal blooms, commonly known as HABs, impact many of New York's lakes," said Commissioner Basil Seggos. "DEC is working to help New Yorkers better understand how to identify and report a bloom, as well as how to keep themselves and their families and pets safe. We're also working with localities to safeguard water supplies across the state." Most algae are harmless, but exposure to toxins and other substances from harmful algal blooms can make people and animals sick. HABs can impact drinking water and recreation, and cause unpleasant odors. "With warmer weather comes the need for increased vigilance in detecting harmful algal blooms that have the potential to invade our lakes and compromise their use for drinking and recreational purposes," said Health Commissioner Howard Zucker. "These new resources complement existing information designed to further educate New Yorkers about algal blooms and expand New York's aggressive efforts to safeguard public health." (May 26, 2017) NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (more on Water Quality in our area]

  • On Paris, it’s Trump and the fossil fuel industry versus everyone else on earth In the past few years, reactionary politicians across the world have been seizing power with the backing of fossil fuel interests. One of those politicians, Donald Trump, is contemplating attacking international climate action by taking the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement. Since the Paris agreement was signed, the threats of climate change have become even more clear. 2016 was the hottest year in recorded history (followed by runners-up 2015 and 2014), the polar ice sheets have both seen dire events this year, and superstorms have ravaged communities across the planet. Backing away from climate action now is immoral, economically counter-productive, and politically foolish. Here are all the signs that show climate justice is a goal we can achieve — if world leaders stay in Paris and commit to more serious action, and we stay in the streets demanding it. (May 25, 2017) 350.org [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • Trump Administration Says It Isn’t Anti-Science As It Seeks to Slash EPA Science Office The Office of Research and Development has been at frontlines of virtually every environmental crisis. Trump wants to cut its funding in half. When the city of Toledo temporarily lost access to clean drinking water several years ago after a bloom of toxic algae, the Environmental Protection Agency sent scientists from its Office of Research and Development to study health effects and formulate solutions. The same office was on the front lines of the Flint water crisis and was a critical presence in handling medical waste from the U.S. Ebola cases in 2014. Thomas Burke, who directed ORD during the last two years of the Obama administration and was the agency’s science adviser, calls the office the nation’s “scientific backstop in emergencies.” (May 24, 2017) ProPublica [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • Mapping 50 Years of Melting Ice in Glacier National Park Glacier National Park is losing its glaciers. The flowing sheets of ice scattered throughout the Montana park shrank by more than a third between 1966 and 2015, according to new data from the United States Geological Survey and Portland State University in Oregon. Using aerial and satellite imagery, researchers traced the footprints of 39 named glaciers in the park and surrounding national forest. They found that 10 had lost more than half their area over 50 years. (May 24, 2017) New York Times [more on Climate Change in our area]

News Highlight

No climate deniers in a raging storm    

by Frank J. Regan


“Photo by Frank J. Regan: "

"Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! Blow!  You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout  Till you have drenched our teeples, drowned the cocks!  You sulphurour and thought-executing fires,  Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,  Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,  Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world!  Crack nature's molds, all germens spill at once  That make ingrateful man!"― William Shakespeare, King Lear

Most people tend to think of Climate Change as a slow and gradual climate disruption occurring sometime in the future. Even if that is true, and scientists have overestimated as to when the most dire consequences of this crisis may transpire, you should still consider what it is we are unleashing on our children. (Actually, most evidence seems to be leaning towards the conclusion that Climate Change is happening far more quickly than scientists predicted.)

Anyone who has experienced a major storm must have had at least one moment when they wondered if the great forces that brought life on our planet had suddenly turned and threatened to extinguish it. Few things in our existence can trigger such a profound sense of peril as one’s world being turned upside down by a major storm.

Yet, even though this response is hard-wired (via evolution, of course) and provokes our keenest sense of dread, we seem to quickly forget this terror once it passes and carry on heedless of the future.

When her doctor tells us that the small growth on our child’s brain is malignant, we do not respond by saying, “My daughter looks just fine and besides her cancer treatments would be very expensive.”

But this is how Trump and climate deniers are responding to Climate Change. They toss a snowball into the Senate chambers (supposedly proving it cannot be warming if we can still make snowballs) and rail about how the liberals are trying to take over the country by increasing government to address this ‘hoax’.

Parents often respond immediately to an unseen growth in their child’s brain with denial but quickly come to their senses knowing that every minute counts. We too must get over our disinclination to put off future threats and deal with them on a scale and time frame that will matter.

The melting of the ice and permafrost in the Arctic and the glaciers calving in the Antarctic are an indication of an unstoppable catastrophe unless dealt with immediately, just like a cancer.

That "all-shaking thunder" of a storm should remind us of that we have the power now to help our children adapt and maybe lessen the consequences of Climate Change.

Time passes.  more...

(Above scripts from Dynamic Drive

Green Business.

Green Business - We are working on finding Green Jobs for our area.  As always, we will post anything we can dip up on finding employment for people who want to sustain themselves and the planet at the same time.

Here's the Latest on Green Business News for the Rochester, NY area:

  • Company to open nation's largest hydroponic greenhouse in Rochester A company is set to open what Governor Cuomo's office says will be the biggest commercial hydroponic facility in the nation in Rochester. The governor says Clearwater Organic Farms  will build a 15 acre, 650,000 square-foot facility at Eastman Business Park, creating 137 new jobs. About half of those positions will be reserved for veterans and the unemployed, the state says. The project is expected to be completed by the end of the year. "The new Clearwater Organic Farms facility will drive innovation, create jobs for New Yorkers who need them most, and bolster economic growth throughout the region," Governor Cuomo said in a release. "Our economic strategy continues to generate new activity, attract high-growth industries to the region and build momentum to move the Finger Lakes forward." (May 10, 2017) WHEC Rochester [more on Plants and Food and Green Business in our area]

  • RIT-led consortium wins $70M in funding for clean energy institute A Rochester Institute of Technology-led consortium has won a nationwide competition and secured $70 million in federal funding to bring a public-private clean energy manufacturing institute here, officials announced Tuesday. The competition was held by the U.S. Department of Energy. The consortium will match the federal award of $70 million for a total investment of $140 million, officials said. The RIT-led consortium includes Xerox Corp. and Caterpillar Inc. (January 3, 2017) Rochester Business Journal [more on Green Business in our area]

  • SED launches Community Solar Array in Greater Rochester Area Sustainable Energy Developments Inc., a clean energy company, will launch the first Community Solar Array project in the Greater Rochester Area in partnership with SunCommon. This offer allows all Rochester Gas & Electric customers to power their homes or businesses with locally generated solar energy, with no upfront cost and anticipated savings on their electric bill. SunCommon is a Vermont-based solar company that has helped thousands of Vermonters go solar through home and Community Solar Installations. (June 14, 2016) Fairport-East Rochester Post [more on Green Business and Solar Power in our area]

  • Investors' Circle hopes to fund Rochester's clean energy scene People in Rochester's startup scene already know about the popular venture capital firms Excell Partners and Cranberry Capital. However, a North Carolina-based firm is joining the mix and looking to pass out money. Investors' Circle of Durham, North Carolina, has been funding startups for 24 years, but now wants to fund companies across New York state. The firm invests in different types of companies, such as software and education. However, the firm's biggest emphasis is on clean energy companies. (February 12, 2016) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Green Business in our area]

Event Highlight:

4th ANNUAL GENESEE RIVER BASIN SUMMIT   

June 15th, 2017  - 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM - RIT Campus 

4th ANNUAL GENESEE RIVER BASIN SUMMIT   River Access and Recreational Opportunities    June 15th, 2017  - 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM - RIT Campus      Genesee RiverWatch is hosting its 4th Annual Genesee River Basin Summit on June 15, 2017 in the Louise Slaughter Building on the Rochester Institute of Technology Campus. 

The topic is "River Access and Recreational Opportunities." The Summit is open to the public. Please join us!   Purpose: Our region is blessed with an abundance of water assets. But those assets are underutilized especially the Genesee River and its tributaries.

The purpose of this year's Summit is to review the current state of river access and recreational use, understand the benefits associated with increasing these opportunities and plan for how we can move forward to benefit our citizens and the local economy.

The Summit will be broken down into four sessions. Available River Access - Presentations will review available river and tributary access opportunities and maps. Available Recreational Opportunities - Experts will discuss the boating, fishing, hiking and biking opportunities available. Why is it Important? - This series of presentations will explore various perspectives on why recreation and access is important to regional tourism and the economy. What Can or Should Be Done? -

This session will look at what kinds of projects and programs are in the works across the basin and solicit feedback from the attendees on a path forward. A complete agenda will be published soon.

Date: June 15, 2017 Time: 8:00am-4:30pm Place: Rochester Institute of Technology, Louise Slaughter Hall, Building 78, Rooms 2240-2210 Registration required:   Click here to Register  Fee: $15 includes breakfast, breaks and lunch. Includes: Continental breakfast, lunch and afternoon break.  

Top Ten Things You Can Do for Rochester’s Environment .

This list assumes you are ready to take responsibility (as a member of the only species capable of doing so) for your presence at this critical time in our planet’s history.  And, it isn’t about just your personal fulfillment thing—our environment isn’t politics, religion, a fad, or a cause; it’s science all the way down. Pollute the planet, stuff happens.  Finally, in order for the effects of this list to be effective a lot (I mean billions) of humans need to do them too.  In the deepest practical sense, everything you do (where you live, what you eat, what you buy, what you throw away) matters to our environment. Ready folks, here we go:

  • Be engaged with the issues surrounding our local environment by monitoring the media, books, reports, and the Internet using the laws of Nature as your guide to monitor how our lifestyle is affecting our environment.
  • When you consume anything--food, water, cars, gadgets, whatever—do so as though you were demonstrating how to consume for the rest of the world—considering the lifecycle of the products you buy, how they are made, how they are used, and how you get rid of them.
  • When you have someplace to go, consider all your options in order of their affect on our environment: walking, biking, car-pooling, mass transit, and lastly a personal vehicle. 
  • Conserve energy until we find a non-polluting, renewable energy source.
  • Vote. If you’re doing good for our environment and your representative in government doesn’t get it, you’re just making yourself feel good without much effect.
  • Recycle, reuse and encourage your local government to create a place where recycling just about everything is the norm.
  • Think twice before using toxic chemicals that make your yard look like a golf course and your house like a hospital.
  • Consider other species (plants and animals) and their role in sustaining our environment.  Our environment, our life support system, IS plants and animals and soil. When they don’t function neither will we.
  • Adopt green business practices: your business will save our environment and be able to compete with the rest of the world.
  • Communicate your concerns about the state of our environment to everyone. Sustainability isn’t going to work unless everyone gets on board quickly.    Encourage all your news sources to have an environmental section daily and help move environmental investigations and news to mainstream media.

 350.org

350.org is an international campaign that's building a movement to unite the world around solutions to the climate crisis—the solutions that science and justice demand. Our mission is to inspire the world to rise to the challenge of the climate crisis—to create a new sense of urgency and of possibility for our planet.  

 

Green Events.

RochesterEnvironment.com Environmental Calendar is the longest running and most comprehensive environmental calendar for our area. Got an environment event? Contact me and I'll get it listed.

Here are some events coming up soon & lots more...    

June 2017

  • Thursday, June 1st at 7PM at this link: http://bit.ly/2qNHPjV.
    • Upcoming Electric Vehicle Webinars | Make a dent in New York's emissions by staying connected and involved with Sierra Club's Electric Vehicle work.  Please join us for two free online presentations from the comfort of your home to learn more about how we can transform the transportation sector, now the largest carbon dioxide polluter in the United States.   Register for a free online introductory presentations about Electric Vehicles on Thursday, June 1st at 7PM at this link: http://bit.ly/2qNHPjV.  Thanks for also sharing this link with your networks to share basic information about Electric Vehicles including models, costs, charging and environmental benefits. Then save the date and plan to join us for the Sierra Club's monthly Electric Vehicle campaign update on Monday, June 12th at 7PM.  Here we will share action opportunities and discuss the VW settlement, Workplace Charging and National Drive Electric Week in September among other topics. Register for that at this link:
  • Thursday, June 1, 6 PM, BANC Sanctuary, 301 Railroad Mills Rd., Victor 14564
    • "Harp Music from Classical to Celtic" and Potluck Supper  Thursday, June 1, 6 PM, BANC Sanctuary, 301 Railroad Mills Rd., Victor 14564 Roxanne Zielger, one of Rochester's most accomplished harpists, and some of her students will present a concert after supper, as well as answer questions about these beautiful instruments.  Bring a place setting and a dish to pass.  www.facebook.com/BANC.roc/    http://www.bancny.org/
  • Sunday, June 4, 2017 from 9:30am to 1:30pm at the Monroe County ecoPark at 10 Avion Drive, Rochester, NY 14624.”
    • Important E-waste recycling event in our area. New York State recycling laws have gone into effect but still too many folks are curbing their old TVs and computers, which get broken into and get scattered through our neighborhoods. This event with Senator Joe Robach is a very quick and proper way to get rid of those old toxic E-waste products. Save the date: “On Sunday, June 4th, Senator Joe Robach will be once again be hosting a Free Electronics Recycling Event open to the community. This event will run from 9:30am to 1:30pm at the Monroe County ecoPark at 10 Avion Drive, Rochester, NY 14624.” Senator Robach To Host Free Electronics Recycling Event On Sunday, June 4th, Senator Joe Robach will be once again be hosting a Free Electronics Recycling Event open to the community. This event will run from 9:30am to 1:30pm at the Monroe County ecoPark at 10 Avion Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. At this free event, community residents will be able to safely recycling their old and unwanted electronics such as laptops, desktops, televisions, video game consoles, cell phones, printers, MP3 players, DVD players, among many other electronics, without having to leave their car. Due to the regulations regarding eledtornics reccyling, items that contain freon, such as refrigerators and other household appliances cannont be accepted. For more information on acceptable and unacceptable items, please visit www.sunnking.com. (May 10, 2017) W YORK STATE SENATOR Joseph E. Robach [more on Recycling in our area]
  • Sunday June 4, 2017; 7:00 PM Free Vegan Refreshments; 7:30 PM Lecture WHERE: United Church of Christ of Henrietta, 1400 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467, in the sanctuary.
    • Lecture by Anthony Marr on How to Save a Million Species at a Time WHEN: Sunday June 4, 2017; 7:00 PM Free Vegan Refreshments; 7:30 PM Lecture WHERE: United Church of Christ of Henrietta, 1400 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467, in the sanctuary. Ample parking in the lot. Anthony and his wife Shannon Wright are on a nationwide Journey of HOPE Tour (Heal Our Planet Earth). Anthony Marr holds a science degree from the UBC (University of British Columbia) and has worked as a field geophysicist and an environmental technologist. In 1995, he became a full time wildlife preservationist. In 2003-04, Anthony Marr visited 41 states in 7 months on his Compassion for Animals Road Expedition (CARE Tour). Here is an excerpt from the tribute to Anthony, upon being given the Henry Spira Award in 2010: “For anyone skeptical of what one person can do alone or in strategic alliance with others, or what can be accomplished without large bankrolls, look no further. For Marr shows what great things can blossom from intelligence, independence, courage, and unqualified commitment . . .”    THANK YOU to the the Henrietta UCC for allowing us the use of their beautiful sanctuary. This event is free, but if possible, register at rochesterveg.org to help with planning.  All donations will benefit Anthony Marr’s Journey of HOPE Tour.
  • Sun, June 4, 1:30pm – 3:30pm Asbury First Methodist Church - 1010 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14607
    • Seeds of Hope Community. Monthly on the first Sunday, On-going, monthly meeting to create community with others concerned about environment, social injustice, etc. The group is free and open to all, and no commitment is necessary. The meeting is in the building just west of the Asbury Methodist church For information about Pachamama Alliance, go to https://www.pachamama.org. For more information about this group, contact Dave Inglis at dri.inglis@gmail.com .
  • Thursday, June 8, 2017 at 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM | Webinar Register here.
    • Community Risk and Resiliency Act - Reducing Flood Risk in New York State A Climate Smart Communities Webinar Thursday, June 8, 2017 at 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Has your community been affected by flooding? Climate change, including sea-level rise, has already caused increased flood damage in New York State, and the trend of increasing frequency of severe floods is likely to continue. Local governments have a key role in protecting their communities against sea-level rise, storm surge and flooding. The Community Risk and Resiliency Act (CRRA), enacted in 2014, is intended to ensure that applicants for certain state funds and permits consider future flood risk, and that local governments have tools to reduce flood risk. Webinar speakers will discuss resources for reducing flood risk that are under development as part of CRRA implementation. Webinar participants will learn about the CRRA guidance on flood risk management, and using natural and nature-based features, like sustainable shorelines, to reduce flood risk. Speakers will also describe a set of model local laws that municipalities can consider adopting to increase their resiliency in the face of climate change. Please provide us with your name and community affiliation, either via email or telephone to the Office of Climate Change at climatechange@dec.ny.gov or 518-402-8448. In the event that we cancel or postpone this webinar, respondents will be notified. (from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
  • JUNE 10TH | 9:30am-3:30pm in Mendon Ponds Park
    • Outdoor Expo 2017 WORKSHOP Wetland Variety & Ecology in Mendon Ponds Park Come with naturalist and Sierra Club member Peter Debes to learn about the surprising, vital and interrelated life in the wetslands of Mendon Ponds Park. The event schedule is coming soon. Visit adk.org and sierraclub.org/atlantic/chapter for updates and presentation time.
  • Wednesday, June 14. 6:30 p.m. at The Little Theatre #1
    • Next up: “The Road to Sustainability” Wednesday, June 14. 6:30 p.m. at The Little Theatre #1 We’re teaming up with Rochester People’s Climate Coalition to explore the relationship between transportation and sustainability. How do the lifestyle choices we make as individuals impact our health, environment, social and economic well-being? A mix of short films from around the world plus live discussion with local leaders will inspire conversation and no doubt, debate. This event will be moderated by Mona Seghatoleslami, host and producer on WXXI Classical 91.5 FM. Reserve your seat in advance with an online donation to Reconnect Rochester (suggested $5 – $25).
  • June 15th, 2017  - 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM - RIT Campus 
    • 4th ANNUAL GENESEE RIVER BASIN SUMMIT   River Access and Recreational Opportunities    June 15th, 2017  - 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM - RIT Campus      Genesee RiverWatch is hosting its 4th Annual Genesee River Basin Summit on June 15, 2017 in the Louise Slaughter Building on the Rochester Institute of Technology Campus.  The topic is "River Access and Recreational Opportunities." The Summit is open to the public. Please join us!   Purpose: Our region is blessed with an abundance of water assets. But those assets are underutilized especially the Genesee River and its tributaries. The purpose of this year's Summit is to review the current state of river access and recreational use, understand the benefits associated with increasing these opportunities and plan for how we can move forward to benefit our citizens and the local economy. The Summit will be broken down into four sessions. Available River Access - Presentations will review available river and tributary access opportunities and maps. Available Recreational Opportunities - Experts will discuss the boating, fishing, hiking and biking opportunities available. Why is it Important? - This series of presentations will explore various perspectives on why recreation and access is important to regional tourism and the economy. What Can or Should Be Done? - This session will look at what kinds of projects and programs are in the works across the basin and solicit feedback from the attendees on a path forward. A complete agenda will be published soon. Date: June 15, 2017 Time: 8:00am-4:30pm Place: Rochester Institute of Technology, Louise Slaughter Hall, Building 78, Rooms 2240-2210 Registration required:   Click here to Register  Fee: $15 includes breakfast, breaks and lunch. Includes: Continental breakfast, lunch and afternoon break.      
  • Thursday, June 15, 9AM-3PM,  Wesley Hill Preserve, near Naples
    • "Early Meadow Butterflies Walk"  Thursday, June 15, 9AM-3PM,  Wesley Hill Preserve, near Naples  Meet at the Park and Ride lot by the Bushnell's Basin exit of I-490 by 9 AM. Bring water, lunch, a folding chair, and insect repellent. Wear long pants and a hat.    Questions: 385-4725   http://rochesterbutterflyclub.org/
  • Sunday, June 18, 2017   9:00am to 1:00pm   Brighton High School front lawn on S. Winton Road. 
    • The Brighton Eco-Fair (formerly Brighton Green Energy Fair) alongside the Brighton Farmer's Market   Sunday, June 18, 2017   9:00am to 1:00pm   Brighton High School front lawn on S. Winton Road.      Come enjoy Nonprofits, Green Vendors, Student Projects, Children's Activities, and a Silent Auction to benefit ColorBrightonGreen.org.  Learn about recycling, green energy, water conservation, green products, and more! ColorBrightonGreen.org

July 2017

  • Thursday, June 29, 10AM-1PM,  Ganondagan State Historic Site   Meet in parking lot of the Culture Center on Boughton Hill Road, Victor, NY 14564.
    • "Mid-summer Butterflies Walk"  Thursday, June 29, 10AM-1PM,  Ganondagan State Historic Site   Meet in parking lot of the Culture Center on Boughton Hill Road, Victor, NY 14564.  Bring water and insect repellent, and wear long pants and a hat.  Optionally, bring a lunch and folding chair.  Questions: 425-2380 http://rochesterbutterflyclub.org/

 

Genessee RiverWatch Initiative Working to restore the waters of the Genesee, improve access, increase use and encourage economic development that benefits from and contributes to the water quality of our region.

 

 

ACTION highlight

Take Action on 'Climate Smart Communities':

Pound for pound, getting community leaders to pledge to the state’s ‘Climate Smart Communities’ program is one of the most effective things people can do to address Climate Change. Take action! It’s all spelled out for you here:

Take Action on 'Climate Smart Communities':



New York State's Climate Smart Communities (CSC) program supports municipalities as they identify, plan and carry out projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, and prepare for the challenges climate change will bring. This program provides resources that enable localities to act on climate, without mandating which programs or policies they should adopt.  

Green Action.

ACTION: Often, I receive requests to pass on alerts, petitions, Public Comments on local environmental issues needing action by the Rochester Community and around the world.  

  • ACTION: Due Date: Comments must be received on or before May 15, 2017.
    • This is your opportunity to tell Pruitt’s EPA that “scrapping air-pollution and radiation rules” is craven and crazy. It’s like asking a hostage if it’s OK if you tape both their mouth and their nose closed while the hostage takers torture them. Go here to tell Pruitt’s EPA, Thank you very much for asking, but no I’d like to have a sustainable future if you don’t mind and don’t even consider scrapping air-pollution and radiation rules. Click here to comment. The EPA wants to know what you think about scrapping air-pollution and radiation rules The US has a lot of rules about which kinds of gases, particles, and forms of radiation can get pumped into the atmosphere. Many of those regulations were written by the Environmental Protection Agency, under the authority Congress granted it through the Clean Air Act. President Donald Trump and many other conservatives see these rules as overly burdensome and believe the country should have fewer of them. Trump's EPA chief, Scott Pruitt, vocally endorses that position, too. (April 19, 2017) Business Insider [more on Environmental Health in our area]
  • ACTION: Due Date: until Memorial Day
    • from our friends over at Alliance for the Great Lakes  "There are Adopt-a-Beach events scheduled at beaches near you for Earth Month — and we want you to join us for one! Being an Adopt-a-Beach volunteer is fun and easy, plus you get to make a difference with your community at your local beach. Keeping Great Lakes beaches and shorelines clean and healthy has never been so easy. You can sign up for an Adopt-a-Beach cleanup today. Spring Kickoff events take place from April 1 through Memorial Day. So, all you have to do is find an event near you that fits your calendar and sign up. I’m happy to help you with any questions you may have, just email me at ndrag@greatlakes.org or call me at (716) 261-9393. Happy Earth Month! Nate Drag Alliance for the Great Lakes "
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Got bike? Got an old bike not being used? Why not donate that bike to R Community Bikes (RCB) and help others get around—without carbon emissions. Action Transportation (walking and bicycling) is increasing in Rochester and you can help get our city more climate friendly. Find out more about BikeRochester and our city’s draft Climate Action Plan that we are still waiting for passage.
  • ACTION: Due Date: Now!
    • I think it proper to now distinguish Pruitt’s epa from the former U.S. EPA, which used to be a respectable federal agency  CONDEMN TRUMP’S ATTACKS ON THE EPA Trump and his Republicans want to weaken the EPA. Say you won't stand for it: here.
  • ACTION: Due Date: Now!
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Great local effort to grow our renewable energy supply. Find out more and how you can get involved: Click here to learn more about RPCC’s Community Choice Aggregation Project! "The Rochester People’s Climate Coalition is pursuing the development of Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) as a way to use the market to grow our local renewable supply.  We began exploring this issue in September 2015 and formed a committee on CCA in December.  Our committee members have begun meeting with governmental leaders to inform them of this policy option. " Rochester People's Climate Coalition
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • From our friends over at the Rochester People’s Climate Coalition: Climate Friendly Food Choices |”Food Choices are extremely important for anyone who wants to take climate change action because: Food Choices have a profound effect on greenhouse gas emissions (one study shows as much as 51%). Food Choices are amongst the easiest changes that make a huge difference—the biggest bang for our individual buck.” Find out more about this issue and contact RPCC to see how you can help this issue locally. More on Food in our area.
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Consider stopping wasteful phone books that littler our neighborhoods and no longer provide a useful service by surfing over here: Department of Public of Service, Comment Form using this case number 17-C-0013. Back in the day, our Rochester Sierra Club Zero Waste Committee tried to halt the delivery of these phone books with little effect. That now the phone company admits that this is a 12-tons-of-waste each year that can be avoided is interesting. Our group noticed over the years how phone books were tossed on to apartment complex porches’ and left for months there while folks just walked over them, avoiding them completely. And for many, many people the phone books would go immediately into the recycling bin—at best. At worst, folks threw them into the trash or let them scattered throughout the neighborhoods. We were told by the powers that be that although many people don’t use these books the advertising dollars that came from the phone books were too important. Now, finally, after long last, phone books are on the way out because they waste paper and aren’t needed. Which has been the case for years. Consider putting the nail this this wasteful coffin by surfing over here: Department of Public of Service, Comment Form using this case number 17-C-0013. More: Phone books to disappear for good The phone book, a one-time necessity that many now consider a wasteful nuisance, is about to disappear from your life forever. Frontier Communications, which provides landline phone service in the Rochester area and some other areas in New York, has asked state regulators for permission to end mass delivery of phone books to its customers. The books contain business listings, government contact information and consumer information. (February 1, 2017) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Recycling in our area]
  • ACTION due date: NOW!
    • Winds of Change by @revkin on Twitter, on Facebook  , or by email on ProPublica is a great way to “to keep track of subsequent changes on federal websites as the Trump administration settles in.” We must remain vigilant on making use our climate science is not being hijacked by ideology in these troublesome times. Much of the public’s and the media’s information on Climate Change comes from federal websites so you’re help is needed in tracking any wavering from the climate facts we need in order to have a sustainable life support system. Help Us Track Winds of Change as Trump Confronts Climate Issues If you see something, say something. ProPublica is eager to get tips on shifts in available government information related to climate change. Until late morning on Friday, the White House homepage had an “issues” link to a page on the environment touting former President Obama’s efforts to build a “clean-energy economy” and tackle climate change. It’s still viewable via archive.org, but almost as soon as President Donald J. Trump’s hand was off the Bible, White House websites flipped to content consistent with Trump’s campaign pledges to roll back such programs. The live White House homepage now reflects President Donald J. Trump’s agenda, including a link to his energy plan, which includes “eliminating harmful and unnecessary policies such as the Climate Action Plan” of his predecessor. (January 20, 2017) ProPublica [more on Climate Change in our area]
  • ACTION: Due Date Now!
    • Act on giving bicyclists a 3-ft break from vehicles, making biking safer, and reducing greenhouse gases. 3 FT PASSING LAW Thanks to the strong leadership of Board President Jim Reed and Board Member Emeritus Ivan Vamos, who himself was hit by a car, and support from Transportation Alternatives, the New York Bicycling Coalition (NYBC) has launched an all-out campaign this legislative session in Albany to amend the vague and impossible to enforce 2010 Safe Passing law. At the very least, we think there should be a 3 feet passing standard, which is now the law in 26 other states across the country. Email your legislators now by sending an email through this very easy-to-use form.
  • ACTION: Due Date: Now!
    • Stop Explosive Oil Trains! Find out if you are in the blast zone and sign the petition. There is a fiftyfold increase in local transport of volatile crude oil trains (which are not and cannot be properly designed to carry this dangerous oil) through our region. Check to see if you are in the blast zone, and Take action and put a stop to this! From our friends over at Mothers Out Front! Really take a moment to find out about this clean and present danger in our community and take action here.
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • "Call on Governor Cuomo and The Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx to take immediate action to protect the public and the environment from the dangers of crude-by-rail." Stop the Bomb Trains "As much as 7 billion gallons of crude oil could move by train through New York State annually under current and proposed permits as the nation’s “virtual pipeline” for crude oil expands. The Department of Transportation can take immediate action to reduce the risks of derailments, which have caused catastrophic spills of crude oil elsewhere in the United States and Canada, including the tragic loss last year of 47 lives and the destruction of a business district in Lac-Megantic, Quebec. The volatility of Bakken crude oil combined with the inadequacy of the DOT-111 railcars used to transport much of this cargo has led rail workers to dub them "bomb trains." Spills of heavy crudes, such as those from Alberta, Canada, tar sands, would have particularly damaging impacts to water and the ecosystems they support – because heavy crude oils can sink, clean-up is next to impossible. " Riverkeeper
  • ACTION:  Due Date: Now!
    • New York needs to transition to renewable energy (like Wind Power) now:  "New York has been slow out of the gate when it comes to opportunities like offshore wind. We can change that. Few states have the potential to be a national and global clean energy and climate leader like New York.  And right now, the state Public Service Commission (PSC) is accepting public comments on how to structure a new Large Scale Renewable Energy Program – and Environmental Advocates is urging the PSC to act on three critical fronts: Establish enforcement mechanisms to hold the state and utilities accountable for supplying 50 percent of our energy from clean renewables by 2030. Make the state’s Large Scale Renewables Program statewide (currently Long Island is excluded from the Renewable Portfolio Standard). Add offshore wind power to New York’s energy mix.  You can urge them to prioritize these initiatives, too!     Despite our state being home to some of the most attractive and productive wind farm locations in the nation, this plentiful source of renewable energy remains completely untapped. With Rhode Island constructing the nation’s first offshore wind farm, and Europe utilizing this same renewable energy source on a large scale, New York can step up and become a global clean energy leader.     Governor Cuomo has made a commitment to ensure 50 percent of our energy comes from clean, renewable sources by 2030. That means dramatically reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and building a clean, green energy economy with offshore wind and other sources of renewable energy.    Take Action Today! " (from Environmental Advocates of New York)
  • ACTION: Due Date, NOW!
    • Fracking ain't over in New York until it's over: Take action: Call on the NYS Senate and Assembly to ACT NOW to pass the Hazardous Waste Loophole Bill! Read more: Time to Close New York’s Fracking Waste Loophole Despite the recent historic ban on high-volume fracking, New York still has a fracking waste problem. More than 510,000 tons and 23,000 barrels – and counting – of waste from oil and gas extraction operations in neighboring Pennsylvania have been shipped to New York landfills for disposal. Leachate from those landfills is then sent to nearby wastewater treatment facilities. And New York State continues to allow the use of certain kinds of waste from low-volume oil and gas extraction on our roads for de-icing and dust control. Fracking waste can contain a number of pollutants, such as chemicals, metals, excess salts, and carcinogens like benzene and naturally-occurring radioactive materials. Due to a loophole in state law, oil and gas industry waste is exempt from hazardous waste requirements, meaning that – no matter what it contains – fracking waste is not classified as hazardous. This “hazardous waste loophole” also means that fracking waste can be disposed of at facilities unequipped to handle it, and in ways that can put our health and environment at risk. (June 3, 2015) Riverkeeper [more on Fracking in our area]
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Submit letters to the Democrat and Chronicle Editors about oil trains passing thru Rochester and gas storage in the Seneca Lake salt mines concerns: Editorial submissions
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Pound for pound, getting community leaders to pledge to the state’s ‘Climate Smart Communities’ program is one of the most effective things people can do to address Climate Change. Take action! It’s all spelled out for you here: Take Action on 'Climate Smart Communities': New York State's Climate Smart Communities (CSC) program supports municipalities as they identify, plan and carry out projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, and prepare for the challenges climate change will bring. This program provides resources that enable localities to act on climate, without mandating which programs or policies they should adopt. 
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Interested in the water quality of our rivers and streams and want to get trained to help monitor them?  "Reminder -- Volunteers for Stream and River Monitoring Wanted: DEC is looking for citizen scientist volunteers for stream and river monitoring as part of the Water Assessments by Volunteer Evaluators (WAVE) project. Volunteers visit stream sites once between July and September to collect macroinvertebrates -- insects and other small organisms -- from the rocks and rubble on the stream bottom.  In 2014, volunteers can participate by joining a local WAVE group led by a trained local coordinator, or by sampling independently. Volunteers working under a trained local coordinator do not need to attend a training session; however, volunteers who want to work independently must attend a training session.  WAVE training sessions rotate around the state on a five-year schedule, targeting those basins that will be sampled by DEC's Stream Biomonitoring Unit the following year.  Three training sessions remain for 2014: June 14 in Esperance, June 21 in Wyoming and June 29 in New Hartford. " (June 13, 2014) The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) 
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW! 
    • Chance to volunteer and help largest wetland in Northeast. "Montezuma Audubon Center Seeks Volunteers   Savannah, NY - September 20 - The Montezuma Audubon Center (MAC), located at 2295 State Route 89 in Savannah, is seeking volunteers to strengthen the current staff’s ability to fulfill Audubon’s mission in conservation.  The MAC is dedicated toward providing opportunities for youth, families, and communities to connect to conservation and enhance the Montezuma Wetlands Complex as an Important Bird Area. We are looking for volunteers interested in routinely supporting day to day needs as an information desk receptionist, animal caretaker for our live reptiles and amphibians, and office supporter to help with clerical tasks. Please call Chris Lajewski at 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org for more information or to sign up today! "
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Thinking it’s about time to do something on a big scale to combat Climate Change?  Think about joining Citizen’s Climate Lobby.  Here’s what Dr. James Hansen, head of Goddard Institute for Space Studies, NASA say’s "Most impressive is the work of Citizens Climate Lobby, a relatively new, fastgrowing, nonpartisan, nonprofit group with 60 chapters across the United States and Canada. If you want to join the fight to save the planet, to save creation for your grandchildren, there is no more effective step you could take than becoming an active member of this group." The contact information for the local Rochester group: nyrochester@citizensclimatelobby.org We meet monthly, and people can contact us for more info on getting involved!
  • ACTION: Due Date: NOW!
    • Can you imagine what our world would look like if everyone used their smartphones to report environmental crimes? Healthier! Become an environmental crime stopper Polluting a stream and getting away with it? Violating the Clean Air Act without detection? Now, anyone with a smartphone can help bust abusers of the environment. New York State Crime Stoppers announced a new phone app that makes it very easy for people to instantly report environmental crimes to the appropriate agency. Cellfare created the app in collaboration with Crime Stoppers, Waterkeeper Alliance, state police and local law enforcement agencies across the state. (November 21, 2012) Investigative Post

 

 

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  • My Comments are in Bold text.

  • 5/27/2017 - Trying to change Trump’s mind on Climate Change is like trying to teach a pig to talk, you can’t do it and it irritates the pig. We need a go-around. In Europe, World Leaders Try To Change Trump's Mind On Climate Change It was eight against one, according to German Chancellor Angela Merkel. On one side, leaders of Canada, Japan, France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, plus two EU representatives. On the other side, President Trump. And up for debate, the peril of climate change and the urgency of the U.S. commitment to the Paris accord to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Merkel said that everyone at the table at the G-7 summit in Taormina, Italy, was urging Trump to stick with the pact, according to Reuters. (May 26, 2017) WXXI News [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/27/2017 - Besides turtles migrating to their nesting areas and frogs and other wildlife crossing our roads we should be mindful of our transportation system’s disruption on our ecosystems. One of the things we did not consider when we built our amazingly complex system of roads was the need for wildlife to move about to live. We now need to understand wildlife’s need to migrate in order to adapt to Climate Change. It’s going to be the dickens to come up with a Climate Action plan that will make it easy for wildlife to adapt to Climate Change by getting across our roads and highways. It’s kind of weird, but human, that we created thousands upon thousands of miles of roads throughout our environment without considering how disruptive that was going to be to the creatures that help make our environment and keep them thriving. But things are changing. Check out this amazing study Toward understanding the ecological impact of transportation corridors  Transportation corridors (notably roads) affect wildlife habitat, populations, and entire ecosystems. Considerable effort has been expended to quantify direct effects of roads on wildlife populations and ecological communities and processes. Much less effort has been expended toward quantifying indirect effects. In this report, we provide a comprehensive review of road/transportation corridor ecology; in particular, how this new field of ecology has advanced worldwide. Further, we discuss how research thus far has shaped our understanding and views of the ecological implications of transportation infrastructures, and, in turn, how this has led to the current guidance, policies, and management options. We learned that the impacts of transportation infrastructures are a global issue, with the potential to affect a wide variety of taxonomically diverse species and ecosystems. (2011) U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. DEC Advises Motorists to Be Alert for Turtles Crossing the Road New York Motorists Encouraged to Safely Move Turtles to Side of the Road The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today reminded the public that the state's native turtles are on the move in May and June seeking sandy areas or loose soil to lay their eggs. Drivers that see a turtle on the road should use caution and should not swerve suddenly or leave their lane of travel, but take care to avoid hitting turtles while driving. In New York, thousands of turtles are killed each year when they are struck by vehicles as the turtles migrate to their nesting areas. New York's 11 native species of land turtles are in decline, and turtles can take more than 10 years to reach breeding age. The reptiles lay just one small clutch of eggs each year, which means the loss of a breeding female can have a significant effect on the local turtle population. (May 26, 2017) NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (more on Wildlife in our area]

  • 5/27/2017 - But we do know that Climate Change accelerates and amplifies Harmful Algae Blooms in our local lakes. Be nice if DEC mentioned that. See: Impacts of Climate Change on the Occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms  (May 2013 US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water EPA 820-S-13-001 MC 4304T) DEC Encourages New Yorkers to Learn about Harmful Algal Blooms as Warm Weather Starts DEC Releases New Brochure to Help Residents Detect, Avoid, and Report HABs The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today encouraged New Yorkers to learn about Harmful Algal Blooms, or "HABs," as DEC's 2017 HABs notification season starts on May 26, and the weather becomes warmer. To help educate the public about HABs, also known as blue green algae, DEC released a new brochure explaining how to detect, avoid and report HABs, as well as the health risks of HABs. "Harmful algal blooms, commonly known as HABs, impact many of New York's lakes," said Commissioner Basil Seggos. "DEC is working to help New Yorkers better understand how to identify and report a bloom, as well as how to keep themselves and their families and pets safe. We're also working with localities to safeguard water supplies across the state." Most algae are harmless, but exposure to toxins and other substances from harmful algal blooms can make people and animals sick. HABs can impact drinking water and recreation, and cause unpleasant odors. "With warmer weather comes the need for increased vigilance in detecting harmful algal blooms that have the potential to invade our lakes and compromise their use for drinking and recreational purposes," said Health Commissioner Howard Zucker. "These new resources complement existing information designed to further educate New Yorkers about algal blooms and expand New York's aggressive efforts to safeguard public health." (May 26, 2017) NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (more on Water Quality in our area]

  • 5/27/2017 - Pruitt’s epa “respects the American taxpayer”; it just doesn’t respect Americans and their life support system. Stop the madness.  Trump Administration Says It Isn’t Anti-Science As It Seeks to Slash EPA Science Office The Office of Research and Development has been at frontlines of virtually every environmental crisis. Trump wants to cut its funding in half. When the city of Toledo temporarily lost access to clean drinking water several years ago after a bloom of toxic algae, the Environmental Protection Agency sent scientists from its Office of Research and Development to study health effects and formulate solutions. The same office was on the front lines of the Flint water crisis and was a critical presence in handling medical waste from the U.S. Ebola cases in 2014. Thomas Burke, who directed ORD during the last two years of the Obama administration and was the agency’s science adviser, calls the office the nation’s “scientific backstop in emergencies.” (May 24, 2017) ProPublica [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/27/2017 - If human-caused Climate Change were happening these are the things we would expect to see—and we are. Mapping 50 Years of Melting Ice in Glacier National Park Glacier National Park is losing its glaciers. The flowing sheets of ice scattered throughout the Montana park shrank by more than a third between 1966 and 2015, according to new data from the United States Geological Survey and Portland State University in Oregon. Using aerial and satellite imagery, researchers traced the footprints of 39 named glaciers in the park and surrounding national forest. They found that 10 had lost more than half their area over 50 years. (May 24, 2017) New York Times [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/26/2017 - I submit that Rochester will flourish better than cities of the South because we will fare better in Climate Change. The South and the West, however they might be thriving at the moment, are in serious need of water—and they are going to get very hot. Rochester has lots of fresh water. We also have healthy soil for those regions of the world in danger of droughts and unbearable heat to come when they can no longer thrive. And, Rochester has the remains of a vast infrastructure (making and moving large industrial components) that can be retrofitted to making solar panels and wind turbines. If we plan and prepare now for the consequences of Climate Change, Rochester will be set for more sustainable development and alluring for climate refuges from the South and other regions. We need to act now to adapt to Climate Change because places in the South are going to be inundated by a lack of water, oceans rising, and heat—lots and lots of heat. Already, Rochester, along with several other major New York State cities, is vastly increasing its electric vehicle charging stations to accommodate vehicles that will make driving more efficient and less polluting. Rochester’s leaders need a vision as a city preparing for a warmer planet, which will help us to thrive. Why can’t Upstate N.Y. flourish like cities in the South?  Several leaders in the Rochester business community recently participated in discussions about economic development across the Finger Lakes region. We talked about reports on our region’s economic progress that vary from favorable to challenged in terms of the gains we are making. One study that we read shows the Rochester and Finger Lakes region’s economic progress as weaker than some other upstate communities. While studies are important to analyze, discuss and learn from, it is difficult to determine where we really stand today by studies and reports alone. I say this because my wife and I recently took a road trip to visit family in Alpharetta, Ga., and what I saw first-hand on this southern swing told me more than any report I could read. (May 25, 2017) Rochester Business Journal

  • 5/26/2017 - Places around the world, like Rochester, don’t want to hear this but there’s going to be harder rains. Preparing for Climate Change in our region should include making our infrastructures more resilient to flooding and overflows. We cannot vote ourselves out of this by installing climate deniers into office. Quite the opposite, we need candidates and leaders who are willing to connect with other governments to keep our properties safe, our water and waste systems from over flowing, and our roads and bridges from being overwhelmed by frequent heavy rainfall. Getting angry and blaming insurance companies for dropping your insurance because they cannot handle increase cases and railing against local authorities because sewage runs into our streets is not going to work. You have to support people in government to make long-term changes to our infrastructures so that these anticipated hard rains won’t cause catastrophes.  Climate models forecast extreme rainfall Europe, North America and tropical regions could all face even harder rainfall if fossil fuel emissions continue to increase global warming. Nobel literature laureate and songsmith Bob Dylan certainly got it right: a hard rain is going to fall. As global temperatures rise, extremes of torrential rain will increase accordingly, with the heaviest rainfall up to 15% more intense for every 1°C that the planet warms. If global temperatures increase by 4°C by the end of the century – and climate studies say they could if the world goes on burning ever greater quantities of fossil fuel and dumping ever higher ratios of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere – then Europe and North America could see the consequences in terms of a 25% increase in extremes of catastrophic precipitation. Rainfall could become even more extreme in some of the monsoon countries, but in the Mediterranean, Australia and South Africa the rain gauges would measure a less dramatic response, according to a new study in Nature Climate Change journal. Research such as this is a consequence of the constant drive within science to test its own predictions. Once again, the outcome of the study delivers confirmation. (May 24, 2017) Climate News Network [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/26/2017 - This is a serious wake-up call. To stop further global warming we must stop burning fossil fuels—trees are not the silver bullet we thought.  It’s looking like the hard work required to change our use of energy—from burning fossil fuels and shifting to renewables, and more energy efficiency—cannot be avoided. We do not have a work-around for continuing to use fossil fuels at the present rate.  I suppose this study, if it bears out, is also a revelation that humanity cannot hinge our efforts on hopes to avoid the need to stop using fossil fuels with other methods like changing what we eat, or geoengineering. Planting trees and reducing our eating of meat and many other actions will help us live sustainably and reduce our footprint on our ecosystems, but they are not likely by and of themselves going to bring down our planet’s temperature to a safe level. Planting trees will not slow global warming Nothing, not even the creation of huge plantations of trees to absorb carbon dioxide, is a viable alternative to drastic cuts in greenhouse gas emissions. Humans cannot simply plant their way out of trouble: trees cannot absorb the ever-increasing quantities of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. If the world’s nations really do intend to contain global warming to within 2°C, there is no alternative to drastic cuts in greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study. The tree could be regarded as low-technology carbon removal machinery and, in theory, carefully managed plantations could soak up the carbon released from fossil fuel combustion. But the sheer scale of such plantations would have devastating environmental costs, scientists say. “If we continue burning coal and oil the way we do today and regret our inaction later, the amounts of greenhouse gas we would need to take out of the atmosphere in order to stabilise the climate would be too huge to manage,” says Lena Boysen from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, who led the study, published in Earth’s Future journal. (May 26, 2017) Climate News Network [more on Climate Change and Plants in our area] 

  • 5/25/2017 - Trump or no Trump the world is desperate to address Climate Change. Should U.S. snub the world? Merkel calls for unity in climate talks before G7 as U.S. holds out German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged world nations on Tuesday to work together to fight global warming and, in a bid to convince U.S. President Donald Trump to drop any plans to ditch the Paris climate deal, argued there would be economic benefits. Speaking at a meeting of about 30 nations in Berlin before meeting Trump at a Group of Seven leaders summit on May 26-27, Merkel told the Petersberg Dialogue that tackling climate change had to be a global effort. (May 23, 2017) Reuters [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/25/2017 - Even if Trump keeps his promise to read Pope Francis’s book on the moral imperative behind addressing Climate Change, will he understand it? Or, will Trump keep to his ideology over his responsibility to humanity now that he is the most powerful person on Earth? To what or to whom does Trump owe his allegiance? Pope Francis gives Trump a climate change message US president promised to read the pope’s encyclical Laudato Si’, which exhorts humanity to care for the environment Pope Francis gave US president Donald Trump a copy of his encyclical on climate change when the two met in the Vatican on Wednesday morning. According to reports from the presidential press pool, Laudato Si’, the letter on environmental stewardship Francis wrote in 2015, was given to Trump along with other religious texts the pope has written. (May 24, 2017) Climate Home [more on Climate Change in our area] 

  • 5/25/2017 - It’s hard to fathom how the U.S. can achieve a New Foundation for American Greatness without science and addressing Climate Change. How can businesses thrive when we’ve turned a blind eye on what it takes to keep a healthy life support system? Hasn’t much of human history proven the viability of science over ideology? Is the public really behind gutting science and environmental protections we have developed to live sustainably? White House Budget Aims to Kill ‘Crazy’ Climate Science As The White House released its budget request for the 2018 fiscal year on Tuesday, the Trump administration made good on its promise to target deep cuts to federal spending on climate, energy, science, research and other programs widely seen as critical to America’s ability to adapt to a warming world and reduce its impact on the climate. White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters Tuesday that the government has been spending too much money on climate change and Trump’s proposed budget intentionally rebukes the Obama administration’s support for federally funded climate research. (May 23, 2017) Climate Central [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/24/2017 - If Trump truly wants to make America Great Again, he wouldn’t let China and India overtake us on addressing Climate Change. China and India Make Big Strides on Climate Change Until recently, China and India have been cast as obstacles, at the very least reluctant conscripts, in the battle against climate change. That reputation looks very much out-of-date now that both countries have greatly accelerated their investments in cost-effective renewable energy sources — and reduced their reliance on fossil fuels. It’s America — Donald Trump’s America — that now looks like the laggard. According to research released last week at a United Nations climate meeting in Germany, China and India should easily exceed the targets they set for themselves in the 2015 Paris Agreement signed by more than 190 countries. China’s emissions of carbon dioxide appear to have peaked more than 10 years sooner than its government had said they would. And India is now expected to obtain 40 percent of its electricity from non-fossil fuel sources by 2022, eight years ahead of schedule. (May 22, 2017) New York Times [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/24/2017 - Be aware as the Trump administration eviscerates the EPA that ‘environmental regulations’ is code for ‘environmental protection’. Each of those protections that we expect from our federal government mostly came about after much environment and public health damage that attempted to address and prevent similar catastrophes. We carve up our EPA at great risk. Let your representatives that a weak EPA is not to our benefit to the public or businesses. EPA remains top target with Trump administration proposing 31 percent budget cut Candidate Donald Trump vowed to get rid of the Environmental Protection Agency “in almost every form,” leaving only “little tidbits” intact. President Trump is making good on his promise to take a sledgehammer to the agency. Under the White House’s latest budget proposal, released Tuesday, the EPA would fare worse than any other federal agency. The proposal would reduce the agency’s current funding by more than 31 percent, to $5.65 billion. The plan would eliminate several major regional programs, including ones aimed at restoring the Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound, as well as EPA’s lead risk-reduction program. The White House also proposes nearly halving categorical grants, which support state and local efforts to address everything from pesticide exposure to air and water quality, to $597 million. It would slash funding for the Superfund cleanup program, which helps restore some of the nation’s most polluted sites, despite the fact that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt lists it as one of his priorities. (May 23, 2017) The Washington Post [more on Environmental Health in our area]

  • 5/23/2017 - Rochester’s Bike Sharing program is so this century transportation. The more who use this system, the better bikes become a real transportation option. Rochester's Bike Sharing Program Making Progress The City of Rochester says it’s making progress on its plan to introduce bike sharing. “Most cities our size and certainly larger have bike share systems,” said Erik Frisch, the city’s transportation specialist. “And it’s something people have come to expect in cities these days.” It would start with 250 bicycles spread across 25 docking stations, largely downtown and in surrounding neighborhoods. Membership is required to access the system. Prices aren't set yet, but there will be no additional fee for trips less than an hour long. The city says it will help reduce car usage and parking demand, while increasing safety. “It’s not just increasing the safety for bicyclists in numbers, but actually, the more people out riding, studies have shown, all users of our street systems will be safer,” Frisch said. “So we’re looking at this as something rally hits on every level as a great investment for the city.” (May 22, 2017) Spectrum News [more on Transportation in our area]

  • 5/23/2017 - Despite efforts by the Trump administration to make Climate Change magically disappear, it hasn’t. Maybe a sprinkling of Fairy Dust might help but if all else fails they should try Science. Sea levels are rising at triple the pace since 1990, find scientists Meltwater from the vast ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica is increasing the rate A new scientific analysis finds that the Earth’s oceans are rising nearly three times as rapidly as they were throughout most of the 20th century, one of the strongest indications yet that a much feared trend of not just sea level rise, but its acceleration, is now underway. “We have a much stronger acceleration in sea level rise than formerly thought,” said Sönke Dangendorf, a researcher with the University of Siegen in Germany who led the study along with scientists at institutions in Spain, France, Norway and the Netherlands ADVERTISEMENT . Their paper, just out in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, isn’t the first to find that the rate of rising seas is itself increasing — but it finds a bigger rate of increase than in past studies. The new paper concludes that before 1990, oceans were rising at about 1.1 millimetres per year, or just 0.43 inches per decade. From 1993 through 2012, though, it finds that they rose at 3.1 millimetres per year, or 1.22 inches per decade. (May 23, 2017) Independent [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/23/2017 - The Interior Department knows what drives sea-level rise and increasing the frequency of coastal flooding (Climate Change) but they just can’t say it. So, in the future we will try to adapt to what we previously understood to be Climate Change and hope we can figure out how to mitigate whatchamacallit it. Interior Department agency removes climate change language from news release On Thursday, a group of scientists, including three working for the U.S. Geological Survey, published a paper that highlighted the link between sea-level rise and global climate change, arguing that previously studies may have underestimated the risk flooding poses to coastal communities. However, three of the study’s authors say the Department of Interior, under which USGS is housed, deleted a line from the news release on the study that discussed the role climate change played in raising Earth’s oceans. “While we were approving the news release, they had an issue with one or two of the lines,” said Sean Vitousek, a research assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “It had to do with climate change and sea-level rise.” “We did end up removing a line,” he added. (May 22, 2017) The Washington Post [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/23/2017 - Because Rochester, NY still has a lot of un-Fracked clean water and soil, it could become a focus for those people whose agriculture crashes because of Climate Change. Climate change could slash staple crops: Study Extreme weather and temperature swings are estimated to cut production of major crops by 23 percent over the next 30 years, scientists warn. Climate change, and its impacts on extreme weather and temperature swings, is projected to reduce global production of corn, wheat, rice and soybeans by 23 percent in the 2050s, according to a new analysis. The study, which examined price and production of those four major crops from 1961 to 2013, also warns that by the 2030s output could be cut by 9 percent.  The findings come as researchers and world leaders continue to warn that food security will become an increasingly difficult problem to tackle in the face of rising temperatures and weather extremes, combining with increasing populations, and volatile food prices.  The negative impacts of climate change to farming were pretty much across the board in the new analysis. There were small production gains projected for Russia, Turkey and Ukraine in the 2030s, but by the 2050s, the models “are negative and more pronounced for all countries,” the researchers wrote in the study published this month in the journal Economics of Disasters and Climate Change. (May 19, 2017) The Daily Climate  [more on Food and Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/22/2017 - Making case for addressing Climate Change mitigation via the Citizens’ Climate Lobby. While putting a fee on carbon could dramatically bring down our planet’s temperature (mitigation), we still have climate adaptation to deal with—protecting our lives, ecosystems, and our infrastructures because we’ve allow so much heat to build up in our climate system. Cracking Washington’s Gridlock to Save the Planet One day, ideally in the not-too-distant future, when Congress finally passes major legislation to curb carbon emissions — to reduce the environmental and economic  harm caused by climate change — Americans will owe a big thank you to the perseverance and discipline of the Citizens’ Climate Lobby. Special appreciation should go to one volunteer, Jay Butera, a businessman from Pennsylvania who has put intense effort into getting Democrats and Republicans in Congress to begin talking with one another about potential solutions. The Citizens’ Climate Lobby is a network of volunteers who have come together in the last several years to advance climate policy in a bipartisan manner. Its support base has increased fivefold since 2015 to 60,000 supporters; among them, 23,000 are actively working to build political will for a national, revenue-neutral carbon fee-and-dividend system, a market-based approach that aims to reduce carbon emissions while spurring employment. (May 19, 2017) New York Times [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/22/2017 - Climate Change explains why our forests are ‘moving’ North but the movement West is puzzling. There’s a freaking lot that we don’t know about the consequences of Climate Change on our planet, on our ecosystems, on our people, on our economies, on just about everything—which is why we should be giving this crisis our full attention. Not know the full details of a catastrophe is NOT good. American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why Climate change only explains at least 20 percent of the movement. As the consequences of climate change strike across the United States, ecologists have a guiding principle about how they think plants will respond. Cold-adapted plants will survive if they move “up”—that is, as they move further north (away from the tropics) and higher in elevation (away from the warm ground). A new survey of how tree populations have shifted over the past three decades finds that this effect is already in action. But there’s a twist: Even more than moving poleward, trees are moving west. About three-quarters of tree species common to eastern American forests—including white oaks, sugar maples, and American hollies—have shifted their population center west since 1980. More than half of the species studied also moved northward during the same period. (May 17, 2017) The Atlantic [more on Plants and Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/22/2017 - While it’s true that the Arctic is warming faster than Antarctica because of Climate Change, it’s warming nonetheless and that matters. There's moss in Antarctica now, and it's getting even greener Plant life on both poles is growing rapidly as the planet warms. A new study has found a steady growth of moss in Antarctica over the last 50 years as temperatures increased as a result of climate change. The study, published yesterday in the journal Current Biology, shows that Antarctica will be much greener in the future, said lead author Matt Amesbury, a researcher at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. The continued retreat of glaciers will make the Antarctic Peninsula, which has been warming at a faster rate than the rest of the continent, a much greener place in the future, Amesbury said. "It's a clear sign that the biological response to climate warming is pervasive around the globe," he said. "The Antarctic Peninsula is often thought of as a very remote and possibly even untouched region, but this clearly shows that the effects of climate change are felt here." (May 19, 2017) E&E News [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/22/2017 - What is Black Carbon and why should we care that it’s ending up in the Arctic? Hint: it may be accelerating consequences of Climate Change. The Race to Understand Black Carbon’s Climate Impact Black carbon is a product of incomplete combustion from forest fires and the burning of both wood and fossil fuels, and its influence on the Arctic is like the proverbial death by a thousand cuts. At the top of the world, black carbon can land on snow and ice, darkening them, which makes them soak up more heat from the sun and melt faster. It can also absorb and radiate heat from sunlight as it floats through the atmosphere.Black carbon may be worsening the extreme warming felt all over the Arctic, record temperatures that are making permafrost disintegrate and sea ice melt. And if the Arctic gets too much warmer, it is, in the long term, like setting off a giant Rube Goldberg machine — once Arctic ice melts, seas rise; ocean waters absorb more heat; methane, another potent greenhouse gas, escapes from the permafrost. The particles that end up in the Arctic have millions of points of origin, drifting northward from sources like wood and coal stoves used for cooking in India or diesel trucks chugging down U.S. highways. But any particles produced in the Arctic itself are far more likely to linger here and become a more damaging pollution problem (May 20, 2017) Climate Central [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/20/2017 - Take home message of recent Bonn climate talks: Climate Change affects everyone, but don’t piss off Trump. At this point in time it seems as if in order to address Climate Change we have to appease climate denial while keeping our eye on the science. It’s kinda like having to keep a community safe by depending on a fire department that doesn’t believe in fires. A delicate matter, indeed. US works on climate interests relevant if Trump stays in UN pact A pared-down U.S. delegation has quietly worked to promote long-standing U.S. climate interests at global talks in Germany even though President Donald Trump is threatening to pull out of an agreement largely designed by Washington. U.S. delegates at the May 8-18 talks in Bonn, seeking detailed rules for the 2015 Paris Agreement to shift the world economy from fossil fuels, have stopped short of stressing Trump's doubts that climate change has a human cause. "I think the main headline at this point is that 'there are many, many measures under review," delegation leader Trigg Talley told the conference in a speech about trends in man-made U.S. greenhouse gas emissions on May 13. (May 18, 2017) Reuters [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/20/2017 - Realistically, because our Great Lakes is filling up with plastic bits, microfibers, and beads, it’s going to take more than volunteers to fix this problem. Because our waste water treatment plants cannot remove microfibers, nor can volunteers remove even a fraction of the litter (like cigarette butts) on the beaches and in the water, we are going to have to stop plastics from getting into our Great Lakes waters in the first place. Plastics in our water are not simply unsightly, they tend to accumulate toxins in the water, fish feed on this stuff and ends up on our table, and much more. This problem is not going to go away by volunteers picking up litter on our beaches, though their efforts are invaluable. Lake Erie plastic keeps volunteers busy Ross Ellet Garbage patches’ the size of Texas have been discovered in the ocean, and now researchers have discovered our Great Lakes are filling up with plastic faster than previously thought. Meteorologist’s use computer models to track storms, wind, waves, and now you can add plastic to that list. The bad news is that our lake is filling up with manmade objects, but technology could help volunteers get the plastic out of our water. On a cold and rainy late April day, a group of volunteers with Partners for Clean Streams lined up at International Park to pick up trash. Zion Kania is one of the 11 volunteers that helped, and she was stunned by her discoveries. Kania said, “It is bizarre the things you will find in a stream. It blows your mind honestly.” Little by little 8 full trash bags were filled up with 100 pounds of glass bottles, cigarette butts, food wrappers, and lots and lots of plastic. All of this plastic will eventually run down the creeks, streams, rivers, and out into Lake Erie unless somebody intervenes by removing it. (May 18, 2017) 13ABC  [more on Great Lakes and Recycling in our area]

  • 5/20/2017 - If scientists could attribute specific extreme weather events directly to Climate Change, would that get the public’s attention? Or would we just find another excuse to ignore this crisis? Extreme weather just might encourage us to get our act together on global warming Much has been written about our incredible psychological ability to ignore or gloss over the threat of climate change. According to Irina Bokova, director general of UNESCO, “the gap between what we know about the interconnectedness and fragility of our planetary system and what we are actually doing about it is alarming. And it is deepening”. This gap between knowing and doing can be explained, in part, by our tendency to reach for defence mechanisms in response to the realities of climate change. We deny the reality of climate change, minimise its implications or our responsibility for it, or project the consequences onto far off places or into the future. Such processes can occur in individual thinking; and they can appear in conversation, groups and wider societies as deliberate but unspoken “agreements” not to talk about climate change in polite conversation. These denial tendencies are supported on an even larger scale in society and culture, as climate change is routinely absented or minimised as an issue – in media, government policy or advertising for example. (May 9, 2017) The Conversation [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/20/2017 - Antarctic holds a lot of ice, really a lot. Keeping our attention focused on how much and how fast that ice is melting is critical to our ability to adapt to Climate Change. Read/watch this great interactive series by the New York Times: Antarctic Dispatches THE ACCELERATION is making some scientists fear that Antarctica’s ice sheet may have entered the early stages of an unstoppable disintegration. Because the collapse of vulnerable parts of the ice sheet could raise the sea level dramatically, the continued existence of the world’s great coastal cities — Miami, New York, Shanghai and many more — is tied to Antarctica’s fate. Four New York Times journalists joined a Columbia University team in Antarctica late last year to fly across the world’s largest chunk of floating ice in an American military cargo plane loaded with the latest scientific gear. (May 18, 2017) New York Times [more on Climate Change in our area] 

  • Comfort Zone: A documentary exploring climate change in upstate New York” | Is climate change a scientific problem? An engineering problem? A psychological problem? All that, and more? COMFORT ZONE takes an in-depth look at what happens when global climate issues come to our backyards. The specific setting is Upstate New York, but the effects, both subtle and profound, illustrate the kinds of effects that can happen anywhere  We encourage you to screen the film with as many people as possible. Please contact us if you need help setting up or promoting a screening, or would like us to attend. Below are some tools and advice to help you have the most successful screening possible. You can also use this flyer to share information about the film with people who might want to collaborate on a screening.

  • 5/20/2017 - Our oceans have absorbed most of the heat from Climate Change and they are becoming acidic and we don’t know how much more heat they can absorb. Governments around the world need to work together on Climate Change and help our oceans adapt. All governments, that is. Ocean acidification is global warming’s forgotten crisis We have the tools to barricade ecosystems against some impacts of warmer, more acidic oceans. But do we have the political will to use them? Most of us are familiar with the climate change impacts we see and feel in our communities: heatwaves, storms, droughts, floods, and so on. But a UN meeting this week about climate change and oceans reminds us a related crisis is unfolding largely away public attention: the one-two punch of ocean warming and acidification. With record temperatures sweeping over continents year after year, it is easy to overlook that the ocean has absorbed some 90% of the heat trapped by the carbon dioxide dumped into the atmosphere since the industrial revolution; and how much of that CO2 has dissolved into seawater as carbonic acid, altering its basic chemistry. The UN meeting follows on the heels of a new secretary general report that investigates the impacts of these changes and the findings are concerning, to say the least. (May 15, 2017) Climate Home [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/19/2017 - Great local media coverage on our Climate Change march, including Mayor Warren  & details on City’s Climate action efforts. People's Climate March April 29 2017 For the second time since Donald Trump became president, the people staged another march and rally to demand action on climate change. The event was organized by the People's Climate Coalition, who also sent two buses with 110 people to Washington DC for a national action. The event in Rochester was one of hundreds of local solidarity actions around the world. The Trump administration is threatening to defund and dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency and has repealed many laws intended to protect the Earth through executive actions. Meanwhile the Rochester area is experiencing record rainfall that is causing some of the worst flooding of lake Ontario in almost 50 years. About 1000 people participated in the Rochester march which began on the steps of City Hall and ended with speakers and music at Washington Square Park. (May 1, 2017) Indymedia Rochester [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/19/2017 - On the other hand, if we dawdle long enough on addressing Climate Change we’ll have to try these kind of risky geoengineering boondoggles. Reversing climate change with carbon-sucking plantations not realistic, scientists warn A proposal to turn back climate change by planting vast swathes of land with fast-growing trees and plants that can be burned for electricity, with the carbon they release captured and stored, is not “realistic and feasible”, scientists said Thursday. The idea, included in many economic and science models on how the world might try to reverse runaway climate change, cannot serve as an emergency back-up if the world fails to rapidly switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy and then regrets the consequences, said scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. (May 18, 2017) Reuters [more on Climate Change in our area]

  • 5/19/2017 - Important E-waste recycling event in our area. New York State recycling laws have gone into effect but still too many folks are curbing their old TVs and computers, which get broken into and get scattered through our neighborhoods. This event with Senator Joe Robach is a very quick and proper way to get rid of those old toxic E-waste products. Save the date: “On Sunday, June 4th, Senator Joe Robach will be once again be hosting a Free Electronics Recycling Event open to the community. This event will run from 9:30am to 1:30pm at the Monroe County ecoPark at 10 Avion Drive, Rochester, NY 14624.” Senator Robach To Host Free Electronics Recycling Event On Sunday, June 4th, Senator Joe Robach will be once again be hosting a Free Electronics Recycling Event open to the community. This event will run from 9:30am to 1:30pm at the Monroe County ecoPark at 10 Avion Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. At this free event, community residents will be able to safely recycling their old and unwanted electronics such as laptops, desktops, televisions, video game consoles, cell phones, printers, MP3 players, DVD players, among many other electronics, without having to leave their car. Due to the regulations regarding eledtornics reccyling, items that contain freon, such as refrigerators and other household appliances cannont be accepted. For more information on acceptable and unacceptable items, please visit www.sunnking.com. (May 10, 2017) W YORK STATE SENATOR Joseph E. Robach [more on Recycling in our area]

  • 5/18/2017 - Listen to the podcast of WXXI’s Connections @WXXINews on Zero Waste in the Rochester area. We need to clean up our act and have a sustainable existence. It can be done, but it’s complicated. Connections: What does 'zero waste' mean? You may have heard the phrase "zero waste" being used a lot lately. What does it actually mean? A few local entities are taking on this sustainability initiative, including CMAC and the Brighton School District. Brighton hopes to be the first district in Monroe County to recycle most of its waste. The initial goal is to divert 80 percent of the district's waste from landfills, and reach 90 percent landfill diversion in three years. Our guests explain what it means to go zero waste in 2017. (May 17, 2017) WXXI Connections [more on Recycling in our area]

  • 5/18/2017 - With typical Pruitt epa hubris, citizens were asked just how they would like to see EPA gutted. We said, make the EPA stronger! Good grief, what country in their right mind would want our main environmental regulatory agency to do less science and less monitoring of our environment in a time of Climate Change, loss of biodiversity, collapse of ecosystems, and pollution? Let’s get back on track and make our environment sustainable. EPA asked the public which regulations to gut — and got an earful about leaving them alone Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency put out a call for comments about what regulations are in need of repeal, replacement or modification. The effort stemmed from an executive order issued by President Trump earlier this year instructing agencies to reexamine regulations that “eliminate jobs, or inhibit job creation” and/or “impose costs that exceed benefits.” More than 55,100 responses rolled in by the time the comment period closed on Monday — but they were full of Americans sharing their experiences of growing up with dirty air and water, and with pleas for the agency not to undo safeguards that could return the country to more a more polluted era. (May 16, 2017) The Washington Post [more on Environmental Health in our area]

  • 5/18/2017 - Because they are coming to Rochester take an electric bus ride in Buffalo and learn more. Click here for Buffalo details.  Mobile ticketing, electric buses coming to RTS A new round of federal funding will help the Regional Transit Service install a mobile ticketing system and purchase five electric buses, according to Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office. The state Department of Transportation on Thursday announced a new round of federal funding Wednesday under a state-administered program to boost projects that enhance pedestrian or bicycle access or improve air quality. In all, 81 projects across New York were selected to receive a total of $112.2 million in federal money. (April 20, 2017) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Transportation in our area]

  • 5/18/2017 - Are we doing enough to plan for how Wildlife will adapt to Climate Change? Only your environmental agencies know for sure. Because Wildlife are critical components of our ecosystems we shouldn’t be merely waiting to find out what species wins and what species loses—for humanity is now a major decider what life gets to live and which gets to go extinct. Climate change threatening some migratory birds that breed in Canada Study finds nine species of birds are struggling to adjust to earlier spring Imagine a day when the familiar bird calls of spring are no more. This could become a reality in the face of climate change, new research suggests. Researchers from the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University of Newfoundland, as well Florida's Museum of Natural History, used satellite data as well as observational data collected by citizen scientists — bird watchers who keep an accurate account on the arrival and movements of birds. They studied the interval between spring plant growth and the arrival of 48 North American bird species from 2001 to 2012. What they found is that the gap grew by a rate of one day per year on average, or five days per decade. (May 17, 2017) CBC News [more on Wildlife and Climate Change in our area]

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