RENewsletter | November 28, 2010

 

The Free environmental newsletter from RochesterEnvironment.com

“Our Environment is changing: Keep up with the Change.”

[11/21/2010 – 11/28/2010]

 

* Need to vent? | Go to my blog: Environmental Thoughts - Rochester, NY

 

* Found an important Rochester environmental story from a credible source that you think needs attention? Or, an Environmental Event, Please, SEND ME THE LINK. If you think this newsletter, which continually informs our community on our local environmental news, events, actions, is worthwhile, please encourage others to sign up

 

*** The November 2010 Environmental Site of the Month Award goes Oatka Creek Watershed Committee   Go to Award.

 

 

Anything else you're interested in is not going to happen if you can't breathe the air and drink the water. Don't sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet. -- Carl Sagan

 

Opening Salvo | NewsLinks | Daily Updates | Events | Environmental Site of the Month | Take Action |

 

 

[Hyperlinks work by CTRL + click to follow a link]

 

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Opening Salvo:  “New dialogue on Climate Change”

 

Climate deniers have been having a field day confusing the public and the media on the science of Climate Change.  But using the Climate Science Rapid Response Team, an online free service, you can contact climate scientists to combat the litany of mistruths the public has been bombarded with on this issue.  Scientists now realize that they must leave the cloisters of their colleagues and reach out to the public directly with the facts. 

 

Ultimately though, this public squabble on Climate Change is a sad commentary on our times:  Scientists shouldn’t have to go head-to-head with those who didn’t learn their ninth-grade Earth science but were able to launch their frightful ignorance to mainstream media.  Yet, there you are.  When you have a social climate where the public and the media who don’t want to talk seriously about the most important issue of our day, Climate Change, the level of dialogue drops to online ‘gotcha’s’. 

 

When all folks in all walks of life should be including Climate Change in all talks dealing with our future, Climate Change has become like the ravings of Churchill’s warning about Hitler’s nefarious intentions in the early 1930’s: an issue so seemingly ludicrous and distasteful that only a Churchill would go on about it—despite the disdain and incredulity of his colleagues.  

 

There is hope.  Those charged with charged with protecting the public do not have the luxury preparing for an environment that doesn’t exist.  I’ll bet they aren’t huddled over their social media contacts trying get away with ignoring Climate Change.  They are moving ahead on Climate Change by beginning preparations for Climate Change in our region.   

 

New Yorkers Learn the Troubles Posed by Sea Level Rise Flow Far Beyond Manhattan - NYTimes.com NEW YORK -- New York state is beginning to take the threat of sea level rise attributed to climate change seriously as a new government prepares to settle in next year. Starting Monday, state officials in Albany will gather with members of the public to discuss a recently released 93-page report that recommends major changes to development planning and conservation along coastlines from the tip of Long Island all way up the Hudson River Valley. (November 19, 2010) The New York Times  

 

You can read about how New York State intends to address Climate Change--and even make comment on the plan.  Instead of going backwards and arguing about what most of the scientists in the world already know, public officials are getting ready:

 

New York State Climate Action Plan - Interim Report - November 9, 2010 | This Interim Report is presented by sections and chapters and, following this list, as a compiled report in three sections.  The public comment period for this report will extend for ninety days, beginning on November 9, 2010 and ending on February 7, 2011. Instructions for submitting comments electronically are provided at http://www.nyclimatecomments.us.   

 

Let’s face it.  The above document is where the public dialogue should be on Climate Change, acting, how to act, not arguing about whether Climate Change is happening.  That horse has left the barn.  From now on, you cannot have a sensible discussion on renewable energy and other plans for the future unless your discussion includes Climate Change.   You shouldn’t be voting for someone who doesn’t ‘get’ the peril or understand the changes that will result from Climate Change.  Do you really want someone in charge of your environment, your parks, your infrastructure, and your children’s future who thinks Climate Change is not occurring?   Think of how much time (and your tax dollars) that leader would be spending trying to fortify his or her ideology, instead of making critical preparations for an environment that is warming up.

 

Read on about the importance of getting the public and the media to understand Climate Change:

 

John Abraham and Scott Mandia - Climate Science Strikes Back | Point of Inquiry "For the community of scientists who study the Earth’s climate, these are bewildering times. They've seen wave upon wave of political attacks. They're getting accustomed to a public that grows more skeptical of their conclusions even as scientists grow more confident in them. No wonder there’s much frustration out there in the climate science world—and now, a group of researchers have organized to do something about it. Their initiative is called the Climate Science Rapid Response Team, and it pledges to organize dozens of researchers to help set the record straight. “(November 19, 2010) Point of Inquiry

 

 

FrankRegan@RochesterEnvironment.com  (Click on my email for feedback)

 

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NewsLinksEnvironmental NewsLinks – [Highlights of major environmental stories concerning our area from the past week]

 

 

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UpdatesDaily Updates – [Connecting the dots on Rochester’s environment. Find out what’s going on environmentally in our area—and why you should care? Clicking on -DISCUSSION – will take you to my blog “Environmental Thoughts, NY, where you can add your comments.]

 

 

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EventsRochester Environmental Events Calendar – [The most complete listing of all environmental events around the Rochester, New York area.]  If you don’t see your event, or know of a local environmental event, please send me the info: FrankRegan@RochesterEnvironment.com with (EV event) in the subject line.

 

 

December 2010

 

 

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ActionTake Action - Often, I receive request to pass on alerts, petitions, Public Comments on local developments, and environmental items needing action by the Rochester Community and around the world. I’ll keep Actions posted until their due date. 

 

 

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AwardEnvironmental Site of the Month Award – [On the last Sunday of each month, we present an environmental award for the Rochester-area environmental web site or blog that best promotes the need to protect and offers solutions for our area's environmental issues.]

 

The November 2010 Environmental Site of the Month Award goes Oatka Creek Watershed Committee .  This is a local environmental web site at its best—taking responsibility for a local environmental ecology and getting that information out to the public.  The Oatka Creek Watershed Committee web site is well designed, pity, and still full of information on who this group is, what they do, and how you can get involved.   

 

Oatka Creek Watershed Committee “The Oatka Creek Watershed Committee (OCWC) is a not for profit group composed of dedicated volunteers from a variety of backgrounds who are working together to develop a watershed management plan for the Oatka Creek Watershed which is located within the four counties of Wyoming, Genesee, Livingston and Monroe in Western New York State. Our diverse membership is composed of people from local government, the farming community, public health, conservation and many other areas, and our activities have been supported through partnerships and federal, state and local grants.”