Lyme Disease - Rochester, NY area 

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Consider the issue of Lyme Disease in the Rochester, NY area--especially in light of the fact that Climate studies of the Northeast predict more cases of vector-driven diseases like Malaria, West Nile Virus and Lyme Disease.    

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Page Contents: NewsLinks | Lyme Disease and Climate Change | Discussions | Resources |

 

 

Ticks & Lyme Disease "Lyme Disease and other Tick-borne Diseases The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and local health departments continue to investigate the spread of Lyme disease throughout New York State.

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection tickcaused by the bite of an infected deer tick. Untreated, the disease can cause a number of health problems.

Patients treated with antibiotics in the early stage of the infection usually recover rapidly and completely.

Since Lyme disease first became reportable in 1986, over 72,000 cases have now been confirmed in New York State." --from New York State Department of Health

 

 

Lyme Disease and Climate Change

As our climate warms in the Northeast, we should expect more cases of Lyme Disease because like Malaria and West Nile Virus they are vector-driven (mosquitoes) they thrive in warm weather.

  • Lyme Disease as a Climate Change indicator: Lyme Disease This indicator tracks the rate of reported Lyme disease cases across the United States. Climate is just one of many important factors that influence the transmission, distribution, and incidence of Lyme disease. However, studies provide evidence that climate change has contributed to the expanded range of ticks,27 increasing the potential risk of Lyme disease, such as in areas of Canada where the ticks were previously unable to survive. The life cycle and prevalence of deer ticks are strongly influenced by temperature.28 For example, deer ticks are mostly active when temperatures are above 45°F, and they thrive in areas with at least 85 percent humidity. Thus, warming temperatures associated with climate change could increase the range of suitable tick habitat, and are therefore one of multiple factors driving the observed spread of Lyme disease.29 Because tick activity depends on temperatures being above a certain minimum, shorter winters could also extend the period when ticks are active each year, increasing the time that humans could be exposed to Lyme disease. Unlike some other vector-borne diseases, tick-borne disease patterns are generally less influenced by short-term changes in weather (weeks to months) than by longer-term climate change. (Pages 78 & 79, Climate Change Indicators in the United States, 2014 Third Edition) from  Climate Change Indicators in the United States Environmental Protection Agency
  • Climate Change and Lyme disease in our region: "Climate change may have serious implications for diseases affecting wildlife and people. Vector species, such as mosquitoes, ticks, midges, and other biting insects, respond dramatically to small changes in climate, which in turn alters the occurrence of diseases they carry. For example, Lyme disease, erlichiosis, and other tick-borne diseases are spreading as temperatures increase, allowing ticks to move northward and increase in abundance. " (Page 185, Report 11-18 Response to Climate Change in New York State (ClimAID) funded by New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (2011)
  • Lyme Disease and Climate Change from the IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change : "Lyme disease is a prevalent tick-borne disease in North America for which there is new evidence of an association with temperature (Ogden et al., 2004) and precipitation (McCabe and Bunnell, 2004). In the field, temperature and vapour pressure contribute to maintaining populations of the tick Ixodes scapularis which, in the U.S., is the micro-organism’s secondary host. A monthly average minimum temperature above -7ºC is required for tick survival (Brownstein et al., 2003). Exposure to both extreme hot and cold weather is associated "Page 625 North America Field, C.B., L.D. Mortsch,, M. Brklacich, D.L. Forbes, P. Kovacs, J.A. Patz, S.W. Running and M.J. Scott, 2007: North America. Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, M.L. Parry, O.F. Canziani, J.P. Palutikof, P.J. van der Linden and C.E. Hanson, Eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 617-652.
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Discussion on Lyme Disease

Rochester area discussions about Lyme Disease must concern how the incidents of this disease will increase as the effect of climate change increase. 

  • Climate Change predicts the spreading of certain diseases—even Lyme Disease in Rochester, NY:  Could this story today (see below) about the increase spread of Lyme Disease be related to Climate Change Rise in Lyme disease expected in the Rochester area | Democrat and Chronicle  If you say, ‘no’, you are probably wrong.  If you say, “It cannot be proved that Climate Change is responsible for the present spread in Lyme Disease in our Rochester, NY region, you are probably right.  So, what is the answer and why does it matter?  For one, Lyme Disease is a growing threat to our area’s public health, check CDC - Lyme Disease - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic.  For another, trying to determine whether or not a disease like Lyme Disease is spreading because of Climate Change is not a discussion one can determine by checking the Internet or your favorite social media.  To find out the answer to this critical question one needs to find a recent thorough study that has focused on this issue.  That will require funding of some sort.  It will also require that your public health officials and government not be prejudiced against the prevailing scientific judgment that Climate Change is happening and happening quickly and will probably be responsible for the spreading of diseases due to the increased length of time vectors of disease will be able to survive in warmer weather.  more...
  • Environmental Thoughts - Rochester, NY: How Global Warming Threatens New York - by the NYS AG#links "Feature: Fighting Global Warming How Global Warming Threatens New York Global warming is one of the most important challenges of our time, and presents an acute threat to New York's environment, public health and economy. Some of the grave impacts that unchecked global warming could have on our state include: More Heat - By the end of this century, summertime temperatures in New York may increase by up to 14 degrees Fahrenheit B making our summers feel like those of South Carolina. This more intense and prolonged summer heat could result increased heat-related illnesses, especially in our cities. In New York City, for example, it is estimated that a one degree Fahrenheit increase in average temperatures could more than double heat-related deaths. Higher temperature could also increase smog and the respiratory diseases it causes, especially among children, the elderly, and New Yorkers with existing breathing difficulties. Further, hotter conditions favor the introduction and spread of insect-borne diseases, including Lyme Disease, Equine Encephalitis, and West Nile Virus." more...
  • Watching for Local Signs of Climate Change: This is probably a non-story for environmental news, but something I’m going to be watching over the years. One of the many predictions about how Global Warming will affect the Northeast is a change in some flora of our area, which will affect some business, and the production of maple syrup may be one of those. (Maple syrup shortage taps wallets - Prices are up after poor spring weather kept production down— If you'll be giving or serving New York maple syrup this holiday season, you probably paid more for it this year. A combination of consumer demand and a supply shortage have boosted prices 10 percent to 20 percent at many area retailers. (December 24, 2007) Democrat & Chronicle more...
  • Climate change will hit home—it’s only a matter of how hard. The latest in climate forecasts for our region, NEW YORK is the report "Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment" by Union of Concerned Scientists. It reemphasizes and updates predictions of massive changes for our area due to climate change. There are other reports (“Forecast For New York” by Environmental Advocates of New York) and undoubtedly more...

 

Senate Majority CoalitionTask Force On Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases "The Senate Majority Coalition Task Force on Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases was convened on October 8, 2013, to address rising concerns in New York State regarding the outbreak and spread of Lyme and Tick-Borne diseases. The Task Force was charged with examining state and federal efforts to combat the continued spread of these diseases and make recommendations for submission to the New York State Department of Health for a State Action Plan to facilitate improved prevention, diagnosis, and treatment protocols in order to better protect New York residents. While Lyme and Tick-Borne diseases have had a significant history in New York to date, recent events have raised the level of alarm regarding the broader consequences that these diseases may have - in significant contrast to information that was previously reported. According to new analyses of State Health Department records, over the past thirteen years, Lyme disease was listed as the cause of death for nine New Yorkers, outside of New York City. Five of the victims lived in the mid-Hudson Valley. Given the tragic consequences of Lyme and Tick-Borne diseases, the Senator Majority Coalition Task Force recognizes this epidemic as a pressing public health crisis, and has initiated steps to create a comprehensive statewide response. " State of New York Senate



 

One of the signs leading into Mendon Ponds - Photo by Frank J. Regan

A view of Mendon Ponds in 2010 - Photo by Frank J. Regan

above scripts from Dynamic Drive

NewsLinks for Lyme Disease in our area

Over the years I have listed NewsLinks as they appear on Lyme Disease pertaining to our area

2014

  • Cuomo signs bill safeguarding Lyme treatments Doctors who prescribe longer courses of antibiotic treatments for Lyme disease have new protections under state law today. Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill late Wednesday that prohibits the state Office of Professional Medical Conduct from investigating a licensed physician based solely upon the recommendation or provision of a treatment that is not universally accepted by the medical profession. Those protections include, but are not limited to, treatments for Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses. The measure was passed unanimously by the state Legislature in the spring, and had been under review by Cuomo's lawyers for months. (December 18, 2014) Poughkeepsie Journal  [more on Lyme disease in our area]
  • Climate Change Linked to Spread of Lyme Disease As if we needed another reason to deplore the impacts of climate change, its warming effects are encouraging the northward spread of Lyme disease, carried by the black-legged tick which rides on deer, rodents and dogs, the Daily Climate reports. While common in the U.S., it was rare in Canada until recently. Because of that, Canadians eventually diagnosed with the disease were delayed in getting appropriate treatment. But with more attention comes more action. This summer legislation to promote Lyme prevention and timely diagnosis and treatment passed the House of Commons by unanimous consent. “So many members of Parliament have been hearing these stories that are heartbreaking,” said Green Party sponsor Elizabeth May. The number of cases reported in the U.S. has nearly tripled from 1991 to 2013. The range of the disease, initially identified in Connecticut in 1977, is found primarily in a cluster of northern states. The U.S. Environmental Protection Association added it to its list of climate change indicators this year. (September 26, 2014) EcoWatch [more on Lyme Disease and Climate Change in our area]
  • Ticks — and Lyme risk — on the rise in Ontario County, Finger Lakes  You don’t need to go far to get bitten by a tick. While disease-carrying ticks used to plague mostly southern New York and New England, and were rare in the Finger Lakes region, that is changing. Scientific studies show ticks carrying Lyme disease are expanding their range northward, westward and into higher elevations. A new field study launched in the spring will document outbreaks of ticks in the Adirondacks and create a baseline to study their spread. Meanwhile, in Ontario County, health officials, business owners and people who enjoy the outdoors are seeing evidence that the tiny, disease-spreading insects are all too prevalent. (August 14, 2014) Penfield Post [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Get ticked off: Beware of Lyme disease Posters warning of Lyme disease are going up in Monroe County parks, testament to the growing prevalence of the tick-borne disease in this part of the state. Lyme disease, transmitted by the bite of deer ticks that get on people's clothing and skin when they brush against shrubs or tall grass, is mild if treated quickly but quite debilitating if it is not. Pets, especially dogs, are susceptible to the disease as well. Until a few years ago, infected deer ticks were not believed to be present in this part of the state and there had been no known locally acquired cases. But the ticks have moved into western New York in numbers and are now commonplace here. According to the Monroe County Department of Public Health, the number of diagnosed Lyme cases among Monroe residents doubled in 2012 compared with the year before and doubled again last year, reaching 80. (July 6, 2014) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Lyme disease measure passes in state legislature Legislation that would allow physicians to prescribe treatment on an individual basis for Lyme disease patients has passed in both houses of the state legislature. Assemblywoman Didi Barrett (D, Hudson) sponsored the measure, which passed with bipartisan support. “This bill would allow doctors the discretion to prescribe vital antibiotics for a period of time beyond their traditional use when they determine such care is in the best interest of their patients without risk of censure,” she said. Barrett noted the Hudson Valley has become the epicenter of the Lyme disease epidemic in the Northeastern US with 50,000 people contracting the disease in 2012 alone. (June 20, 2014) EmpireNews.net [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Senate urges Health Department to create action plan for Lyme disease A state Senate task force today called on the state Health Department to increase its oversight and awareness efforts to eradicate the growing threat of Lyme disease across much of New York. Since Lyme disease first became reportable in 1986, 95,000 cases have been confirmed in New York. Of the nine deaths attributable to the degenerative disease, five occurred in the mid-Hudson Valley -- where the ticks are most prevalent. The Senate, which is controlled by a coalition of Democrats and Republicans, said it plans a statewide conference on Lyme disease with researchers, including those from Cornell University and Binghamton University. (June 18, 2014) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Lyme Disease and Climate Change in our area]
  • Lyme disease on the rise  Dogs and ticks have a long history together. And because of that relationship, man's best friend is a good indicator of how prevalent Lyme disease is in an area. In Monroe County, the number of dogs testing positive for Lyme disease has been increasing. So far this year, 550 Monroe County dogs have tested positive for the disease, according to the Companion Animal Parasite Council, a national veterinary advisory group. By comparison, 479 dogs tested positive in all of 2011. Human cases are rising, too. In 2012, Monroe County physicians reported 40 cases of Lyme disease, up from four cases in 2002, according to the State Department of Health. (May 28, 2014) Rochester City Newspaper [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Lyme disease cases increase in Finger Lakes Lyme disease is a bacterial (borriela) infection transmitted through the bite of an infected deer ticks that if caught early enough can be treated successfully with antibiotics. Initial symptoms can include fever, chills fatigue, and in 60 to 80 percent of cases, a bull’s-eye rash at the bite. In some, symptoms can persist beyond a few months, but the majority get better within weeks, said Douglas MacQueen, an infectious disease doctor in Ithaca, who sees an uptick in Lyme patients in May, June and July. “People can get very sick with Lyme and get a lot of different manifestations but the good thing is that they’re all 100 percent treatable with antibiotics regardless of the stage they’re diagnosed at,” he said. But as the number of confirmed Lyme disease cases in humans increases in the Southern Tier and Finger Lakes, health departments are making it a priority to inform the citizenry of its effects and how to prevent it. Deer ticks are currently in their nymph stage, the size of a poppy seed, and are often difficult to detect. (May 5, 2014) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Tick invasion: Lyme spreading nationally — and found in Ontario County“If you looked at a deer tick map 10 years ago,” said Welser, it would not have even shown any tick population in Ontario County — but today, the county's on the map. While better reporting may be a factor, he said, “we are definitely seeing an increase in tick activity.” Lyme disease affects about 30,000 people a year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In New York, the state Department of Health has documented more than 100,000 cases of Lyme disease since reporting began in 1986, according a tick health alert issued April 9 by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. New York averages more than 5,500 new Lyme disease cases each year, stated the governor in the alert urging people to take precautions when in contact with any vegetation, whether it be in the woods, fields or even a manicured lawn. (Aril 17, 2014) Daily Messenger [more on Lyme disease in our area]
  • Health Alert - Governor Cuomo Advises New Yorkers to Be Cautious of Ticks as Warmer Weather Arrives “While New Yorker’s are out taking advantage of the Spring weather, it is important to ensure safety remains a top priority,” Governor Cuomo said. “New Yorkers of all ages should take a few moments to educate themselves about the health risks associated with tick bites and take proper precautions to protect themselves from them."  Lyme disease is caused by the bite of an infected deer tick. Ticks are active when the weather stays above freezing, usually from April through November. The time of greatest concern is in late spring and early summer when nymphal ticks are active. In the nymphal stage of life, deer ticks are small (about the size of a poppy seed) and difficult to see. Nymphal deer ticks are responsible for the majority of Lyme disease cases. In tick-infested areas, any contact with vegetation, even playing in a well-manicured yard, can result in exposure to ticks. (April 9, 2014) Governor Andrew M. Cuomo [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Maybe Climate Change is another of those ‘lots of things’ the white-footed mouse, a carrier of Lyme Disease, is resilient to.  As Lyme disease is expected to increase according to climate studies, this tale of the mouse could be one of the reasons why.   Study: Little mouse is a big Lyme carrier  ALBANY — While bloodsucking ticks can lay waste to a moose and infect humans with devastating diseases, the tiny parasites and the bacteria they carry have no apparent effect on one wee woodland creature: the white-footed mouse. That conclusion in this month’s journal Ecology underscores why the mouse is such an effective transmitter of tick-borne afflictions such as Lyme disease, which affects about 30,000 people a year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (April 7, 2014) Daily Messenger [more on Environmental Health and Lyme disease in our area]

2013

  • CDC: Number of U.S. Lyme Disease Cases 10 Times Higher Than Reported New government data reveals the number of Lyme disease cases in the United States may be about 10 times higher than previously reported. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year, while only about 30,000 cases are reported to the agency. A recent study in the journal Science linked the loss of biodiversity from human-impacted climate change to the increased spread of Lyme disease and other infectious illnesses. (August 20, 2013 Democracy Now! [more on Lyme Disease and Climate Change in our area]
  • Lyme disease cases happen more often than reported Lyme disease appears to be more prevalent in the U.S. than what's generally reported to public health experts. Ticks spread Lyme disease which can cause fevers, headache, fatigue, a skin rash and more severe symptoms if left untreated.   Now a preliminary report from the Centers for Disease Control and prevention finds about 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease every year.  (August 20, 2013) WHEC [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Lyme disease on the uptick in upstate New York Why are Lyme disease-carrying deer tick populations growing in central New York? “The reason for increasing tick populations and concomitant infections is likely complex,” said Laura C. Harrington, professor and chair of the Department of Entomology at Cornell. “Recent trends with less extreme sustained cold temperatures in the winter may lead to greater overwintering survival of ticks. Higher populations or infection rates in key Lyme bacteria reservoirs, such as the white-footed mouse, also may be responsible. Even factors such as increased awareness and vigilance by physicians and veterinarians may play a role.” (July 25, 2013) Cornell Chronicle Online [more on Lyme Disease in our area]
  • Lyme disease becoming an area issue Lyme disease has quietly gained a foothold in the Rochester area, and health officials are now saying for the first time there have been numerous locally acquired cases of the tick-borne bacterial infection. No longer is Lyme disease something that Rochesterians catch somewhere else. Today, a not-insignificant number of local deer ticks carry Lyme, creating the chance of exposure to the potentially serious infection in local parks, fields, forests and even backyards. The list of unwary people contracting Lyme disease locally remains small — there are no hard figures, but it’s probably in the range of one or two dozen in recent years — but several cases have come to light in the last few weeks. (July 21, 2013) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Lyme Disease in our area]

2012

2011

2010

2009

  • Lyme Disease: more dogs need vaccines : News : WSTM NBC3 Veterinarians staffing  the State Fair horse barns are answering questions, and Lyme Disease is a hot topic. (August 27, 09) Local News, Weather and Sports for Syracuse and Central New York - Powered by WSTM NBC3
  • Protect Against Tick Bites,' Urges State Health Commissioner May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month Albany,N.Y. (May 22, 2009) -- Governor David A. Paterson has proclaimed May Lyme Disease Awareness Month to remind New Yorkers to "Be Tick Free" and take precautions from now through the fall season to protect themselves against potential tick-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease. Lyme disease is caused by the bite of an infected deer tick. Ticks are active when the weather stays above freezing, usually from April through November, with peak activity in spring and early summer and again in the fall. If left untreated, Lyme disease can cause serious health complications, including musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiac problems. (May 22, 09) New York State Department of Health
  • Local Lyme disease cases jump- Syracuse.com Most of the cases have been in Fayetteville-Manlius area, health commissioner says. Incidents of locally acquired Lyme disease are being reported in record numbers in Onondaga County - particularly in the Fayetteville-Manlius area. (July 2, 08) Syracuse NY Local News, Breaking News, Sports & Weather - syracuse.com
  • May is Lyme Disease Prevention Month Ticks & Lyme Disease Lyme Disease and other Tick-borne Diseases The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and local health departments continue to investigate the spread of Lyme disease throughout New York State. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the bite of an infected deer tick. Untreated, the disease can cause a number of health problems. Patients treated with antibiotics in the early stage of the infection usually recover rapidly and completely. Since Lyme disease first became reportable in 1986, over 72,000 cases have now been confirmed in New York State. --from New York State Department of Health

2008

2007

  • State Health Commissioner Participates in Tick Dragging Exercise to Kick Off Lyme Disease Prevention Month ALBANY, May 14, 2007 – New York State Health Commissioner Richard F. Daines, M.D., will kick off Lyme Disease Awareness Month today by participating in a "tick dragging" exercise in Columbia County to highlight the need for Lyme disease prevention. "Governor Spitzer has proclaimed May Lyme Disease Awareness Month to remind New Yorkers that Lyme disease remains an urgent health concern in our state, with more than 73,000 confirmed cases reported since 1986," said Dr. Daines. "The good news is that Lyme disease is preventable by taking simple precautions such as wearing light colored clothing, by tucking pants into socks and doing a tick check after walking in wooded areas." New York State Department of Health
  • Lyme and tick-borne diseases research center opens at Columbia - Columbia University Medical Center has opened the first endowed research center for chronic Lyme disease in the world. The Lyme & Tick-Borne Diseases Research Center in New York will use its vast resources to bring together various disciplines from within and outside the University to address fundamental clinical and basic science questions that plague adults and children affected by Lyme disease. (May 9, 07) New York State News on the Net!

2006

  • Schumer targets Lyme disease U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer, citing a sudden rise in the number of Lyme disease cases in Upstate New York, visited a DeWitt park Monday to announce his push for a federal prevention effort. Schumer said the number of people infected with the tick-borne disease in Upstate counties increased 58 percent from 629 cases in 2005 to 994 cases so far this year. (July 19, 2006) Syracuse.com: Latest News and More

2005

  • State Health Commissioner Novello Urges New Yorkers to Take Precautions to Avoid Tick Bites, Prevent Lyme Disease ALBANY, NY, May 11, 2005 - State Health Commissioner Antonia C. Novello, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., today launched an education and awareness campaign, "Be Tick Free" to urge New Yorkers to protect themselves against potential tick-borne diseases that may cause chronic health conditions. As part of the State's public awareness efforts, Governor Pataki has proclaimed May as Lyme Disease Awareness Month in New York State. Dr. Novello said, "Lyme disease is a serious illness that we continue to combat in coordination with local health departments to help better educate New Yorkers about the disease and the precautions they can take to avoid being bitten by ticks. Our coordinated efforts with communities where ticks are reportedly most prevalent are going a long way to help us in the fight against Lyme disease." New York State Department of Health

2003

  •  Looking for a Vaccine to Defang the Lyme Tick Dr. José Ribeiro is sequencing the "spitome" of the deer tick. This is a little bit like sequencing a genome, except that it has to do with saliva, specifically the saliva of the deer tick, the tiny menace that lives off deer and white-footed mice and likes to give suburban gardeners Lyme disease. (May 25, 2003) The New York Times on the Web
  •  'Infected ticks marching northward' - timesunion.com Hudson-- Columbia County had high infection rate in 2002; health officials fear Albany and Rensselaer counties are next Through the accident of geography, Columbia County has become ground zero in the public health battle against Lyme disease. The rural county -- with the highest per capita rates of the disease in the nation year -- was perfectly situated to become the newest epicenter for the sometimes debillitating disease. It was the next likely place for infected ticks to head in their march north up the Hudson River Valley. And it is home to bountiful wildlife, such as deer and mice, that ticks feed on.  (April 27, 2003) Albany NY Times Union: timesunion.com

2002

  •  Officials fear rise in Lyme disease The tick-transmitted disease can be found across New York state.A mild winter has given the deer tick a much longer window of opportunity to find hosts and breed on them, increasing the potential for Lyme disease this season, says one official. (June 6, 2002) Daily Messenger

2001

  • Instant Results From New Test for Lyme Disease CHICAGO (Reuters) - A quick, newly approved blood test for Lyme disease eliminates the anxious wait for those who fear they are infected with the tick-borne illness, the researcher who helped develop the test said Sunday.  (Monday, September 10, 2001) Yahoo News
  • Lyme Disease Is Hard to Catch and Easy to Halt, Study Finds  Researchers said they hoped the findings of three new studies would ease what they called inflated public fear of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is very difficult to catch, even from a deer tick in a Lyme-infested area, and can easily be stopped in its tracks with a single dose of an antibiotic, a new study shows. (June 13, 2001) Yahoo News
  • Lyme Disease Vaccine Faces U.S. Scrutiny  WASHINGTON - A panel of U.S. experts is set to hear arguments Wednesday about whether a vaccine against Lyme disease may be linked to rare cases of arthritis, a charge the product maker has disputed. (January 31, 2001) (Reuters) 
  • 8/31/00-- In the paper version of the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, the editors have spoken about the West Nile Virus in West Nile Virus Arrives. They remind us that the WNV infected fewer than seventy humans, last year, Lyme Disease was diagnosed in 4, 403 New Yorkers. 
  • BIODIVERSITY MAY BE BUFFER AGAINST LYME DISEASE People living in areas of abundant biodiversity may have an easier time dodging the agent of Lyme disease. Source: Environmental News Network

2000

 

Resources for Lyme Disease in our area

  • DVBID: Home Page | CDC Lyme Disease Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans.
  • Ticks & Lyme Disease Lyme Disease and other Tick-borne Diseases The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and local health departments continue to investigate the spread of Lyme disease throughout New York State. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the bite of an infected deer tick. Untreated, the disease can cause a number of health problems. Patients treated with antibiotics in the early stage of the infection usually recover rapidly and completely. Since Lyme disease first became reportable in 1986, over 72,000 cases have now been confirmed in New York State. New York State Department of Health
  • Insect Repellents: Use and Effectiveness | Pesticides | US EPA What would you like to know about insect repellents? We can help you find information about how long EPA-registered repellents will work and how to use them. We also have information about other ways to protect yourself from biting insects as well as some of the reasons you might want to use insect repellents Effective insect repellents can protect you from serious mosquito- and tick-borne diseases. In the United States, mosquitoes can transmit diseases like St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile virus. Ticks can transmit serious diseases like Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Ehrlichiosis. --from US Environmental Protection Agency